big_teee 10/30/2012 10:08 PM
Ubuntu?
Anyone try the Ubuntu Linux.
I just downloaded the 12.10 Desktop version.
I put it on a DVD then Loaded it to a USB Thumb Drive.
I've always used Mandriva, and the Ubuntu runs circles around Mandriva.
It is very fast, small, but has a lot of basic programs.
The thumb drive I put it on was a 8gb Scandisk, I got at WalMart for $5 bucks.
Give it a try if you want something to mess with.
 
big_teee 11/2/2012 1:23 PM
I like the Ubuntu ok, looking for something that runs that good and fast, but looks and acts more like Windows.
On Flash drive #2 I tried first Mandriva, then fedora 17.
They loaded and ran ok, but seemed very antiquated, and slow.
I then put on Linux Mint 13 KDE Desktop on Drive #2.
I liked the OS, but didn't care for the KDE.
I formatted then Put Mint 13 Mate Desktop on #2.
It is great, and looks more like a windows desktop, and has the speed and ease of the Ubuntu 12.10.
I may try the Mint 13 Cinnamon desktop on a 3rd Flash drive, after I purchase some more of the $5 flash drives on sell at Wally World.
Linux has made great strides lately.
T
 
Mark Hammer 11/2/2012 1:41 PM
I recently got myself one of those Raspberry Pi things. Wish it was able to run Ubuntu, but at the moment there seem to be only a few somewhat reduced distros of Debian it will run.
 
Steve A. 11/2/2012 2:07 PM
One of my concerns about the various versions of Linux is that I doubt if they will support all of the Windows programs I use. Rather than hope for a good Windows virtual machine in Linux I think that a better solution would be a dual boot setup. I would use Linux mainly for browsing and email, while the Windows partition would run my "real" programs but not be connected to the internet (unless absolutely necessary to register or activate a program.)

Steve Ahola
 
big_teee 11/2/2012 2:52 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
One of my concerns about the various versions of Linux is that I doubt if they will support all of the Windows programs I use. Rather than hope for a good Windows virtual machine in Linux I think that a better solution would be a dual boot setup. I would use Linux mainly for browsing and email, while the Windows partition would run my "real" programs but not be connected to the internet (unless absolutely necessary to register or activate a program.)

Steve Ahola
That is the beauty of a Laptop, and the Usb Flash drive.
Stick it in and boot to Linux.
Take it out, and boot to windows.
Works real slick.
I don't use a desktop, so don't have that worry.
 
big_teee 11/5/2012 7:48 AM
For now the Linux winner IMHO is Linux Mint 13 Maya, with Mate Desktop.
With some customizing, you can make the desktop very close to the XP desktop.
Runners up are, Mint 13 with Cinnamon desktop, and then Ubuntu, Fedora, and mandriva.
There are many others I didn't try.
May try Lubuntu, and Debian when I get time.
Here is what Mint 13 Looks like, have a look.
Linux Mint Debian 201204 with Cinnamon, Mate & XFCE - Perfeck - YouTube
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7G7TJ...eature=related
T
 
morbe 11/14/2012 9:27 AM
I love Linux and I have been using it for a while. I am i Huge computer geek. I have been working in IT for the better part of 8 years and my lap top and home PC are all linux. I'm running Ubuntu 10.04 at home that I am wiping and reinstalling another flavor. On my Laptop I'm running Bohdi Linux which is like Ubuntu lite. There are several version of linux out there. Some great ones can be found. just do a google search for "Distrowatch" its great to get specialy designed flavors of linux. geared to what you need to like. And to top it off they are free! you cant beat that. Other than my wifes computer and my daughters computer every other computer in my house is running linux. There is a wealth of info on home recording with linux out there as well. Just let me know if you need some help with it. I can point you in some really cool directions.
plain and simple Linux just rules. IMHO.
 
big_teee 11/14/2012 9:48 AM
Quote Originally Posted by morbe View Post
I love Linux and I have been using it for a while. I am i Huge computer geek. I have been working in IT for the better part of 8 years and my lap top and home PC are all linux. I'm running Ubuntu 10.04 at home that I am wiping and reinstalling another flavor. On my Laptop I'm running Bohdi Linux which is like Ubuntu lite. There are several version of linux out there. Some great ones can be found. just do a google search for "Distrowatch" its great to get specialy designed flavors of linux. geared to what you need to like. And to top it off they are free! you cant beat that. Other than my wifes computer and my daughters computer every other computer in my house is running linux. There is a wealth of info on home recording with linux out there as well. Just let me know if you need some help with it. I can point you in some really cool directions.
plain and simple Linux just rules. IMHO.
Welcome:
I agreee with most you say.
I check Distrowatch daily.
I have tried about 20 different linux versions, in the past month.
Biggest problems with a lot of them, is they won't run a lot of the different hardware out there.
Ubuntu, Mint, and a few more have that worked out.
Also You want a linux that supports auto updates.
Some of the smaller distros don't update, and what you load is what you get.
I have tried 3 different versions of OpenSuse.
None of them will run my graphics card in my new laptop.
Hopefully as time goes on they will all support more drivers.
I first download a Live disk.
If the live version will run and support your hardware, I then load it and go from there.
Waiting for the new official version of Mageia 3 to come out, but think it will be a few months.
Terry
 
morbe 11/14/2012 10:03 AM
I normally dont run the Live CD's I install the full version of Ubuntu making my PC a true linux box. I found that you can find for most video cards. I have an older Nvidia in my main PC so the ubuntu nvidia package works great. I get a really good FPS via "GLXgears" I cant game really because WINE will not play the games I had from Windows. Im not sure what video cards that my 10 year old laptop has but the Ubuntu native drivers work well enough.
What hardware drivers are you having trouble with?
 
nickb 11/14/2012 10:16 AM
Steve,

You could work the other way around and use a VM such as VirtualBox (free) in which to run linux. Sounds like this would work for you as your linux use is quite light. You can specify a shared folder to allow file sharing between the OS's.
 
big_teee 11/14/2012 10:25 AM
Quote Originally Posted by nickb View Post
Steve,

You could work the other way around and use a VM such as VirtualBox (free) in which to run linux. Sounds like this would work for you as your linux use is quite light. You can specify a shared folder to allow file sharing between the OS's.
Virtual box and Wine are both interface options.
On the Live versions.
If it is something new, I'm not familiar with, I load the live first.
If I don't like the live and It won't run major hardware like graphics, wireless, etc.
Then I move on and don't waste my time with a full system load.
T
 
morbe 11/14/2012 11:34 AM
Big_teeee, Wine is a Windows Emulator, its intended to run Windows based products in Linux Its free of course but its very sketchy Some Windows based software runs flawless but other run with several bugs. From personal experience its mediocre through Crossover is another emulator but its 40$. I've never tried it. I've never heard of Virtual Box but from what it seems its free VM software to run other OS's on a windows computer. Running a live CD will only install a basic set instructions and drivers of a Linux Operating System. This may be why your having trouble with getting hardware to work correctly. especially since a live CD is loaded into memory like a program and memory is volatile meaning that almost nothing is saved. On the other hand Linux to look, feel and seem very alien to those who have ran windows their entire lives. It is however very similar to MAC in some respects. Keep playing with he Live CD's and have fun, thats what linux is for! So Good for you!

@ Steve, I think what you are doing is great as well the only thing I found hard to swallow was your comment about running "Real Programs" Linux Offers plenty of really good programs that rival those of Windows based and Mac Based. For example, I record my band on a portable mixer and then clean it up and master it on a program called Adour (Garage band) which is free for Windows as well. another Free program written for Linux but available for Windows is Gimp(Adobe photshop). its a really great graphics editor that rivals the competition in my opinion.

Please dont think that Im tooting my own horn or talking down to you guys because Im a linux guru. Becuase thats not my intention. I understand different strokes for different folks. There are things about windows that I really miss, Like Gaming but When it came time for me yo upgrade from Windows xp, I didnt really want to pay for Windows Vista when Windows 7 was around the corner. So I installed Linux and never looked back.
 
morbe 11/14/2012 12:15 PM
Gig_teee, Have fun with the live CD's Its a great way to get your feet wet with linux. Just keep in mind that they are very basic versions of the OS, sort of like free ware or trial version in Windows. and WINE is a Windows emulator that lets you run windows programs in Linux but it can be very quirky. and the other software mentioned is a VM allowing you to run other OS's within windows.

Steve, LOL Linux has a bunch of "Real Programs" some even rival the software they minic.
 
big_teee 11/14/2012 1:40 PM
Quote Originally Posted by morbe View Post
Gig_teee, Have fun with the live CD's Its a great way to get your feet wet with linux.
You need to read my whole posts!
I load the lives to see if I like them before I go to the trouble to load the whole system on my Hard drive.
I have said that repeatedly in this thread.
I'm not an engineer, but when it comes to linux, I'm not a novice either.
I have been messing with linux, off and on for over 10 years.
Peace, and Read the whole post!
Terry
 
morbe 11/14/2012 1:50 PM
my bad sorry,
 
Steve A. 11/15/2012 5:19 PM
morbe:

I did say "real" programs in quotes so as to not to denigrate the programs available on the Linux platform which can handle many tasks. There are certain programs and plug-ins I like to use for audio recording, for audio editing, for audio restoration and for mastering- at my advanced age (61) I would rather not deal with learning new programs unless absolutely necessary. Not to mention the money invested in these Windows programs.

I don't see how using Linux exclusively is any better than using a dual boot scenario with Windows and Linux. Why even bother with WINE (a Windows emulator) when you can have an authentic Windows install on a different partition? One of Windows big weaknesses is its vulnerability on the internet. So why not keep the Windows partition disconnected which would also eliminate the necessity for a real time antivirus scanner (just make sure that any discs or flash drives you insert are free of viruses.)

Steve Ahola

P.S. FWIW I think that there are too many versions of Linux out there. I think it would be better if several of the software developers collaborated on a single version of Linux, working out the bugs and coming up with more extensive driver support. For diversity there could be a wide assortment of skins available that would run the basic unified Linux code. With a unified version of Linux I think that more software developers would create programs and ports for the platform. Just my own uniformed take on things...
 
big_teee 11/15/2012 6:09 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
morbe:

I did say "real" programs in quotes so as to not to denigrate the programs available on the Linux platform which can handle many tasks. There are certain programs and plug-ins I like to use for audio recording, for audio editing, for audio restoration and for mastering- at my advanced age (61) I would rather not deal with learning new programs unless absolutely necessary. Not to mention the money invested in these Windows programs.

I don't see how using Linux exclusively is any better than using a dual boot scenario with Windows and Linux. Why even bother with WINE (a Windows emulator) when you can have an authentic Windows install on a different partition? One of Windows big weaknesses is its vulnerability on the internet. So why not keep the Windows partition disconnected which would also eliminate the necessity for a real time antivirus scanner (just make sure that any discs or flash drives you insert are free of viruses.)

Steve Ahola

P.S. FWIW I think that there are too many versions of Linux out there. I think it would be better if several of the software developers collaborated on a single version of Linux, working out the bugs and coming up with more extensive driver support. For diversity there could be a wide assortment of skins available that would run the basic unified Linux code. With a unified version of Linux I that that more software developers would create programs and ports for the platform. Just my own uniformed take on things...
They have come along way with the Linux.
Used to, it was hard to get all the computer hardware to run on a single version of linux.
Your sound may not work or a printer may be screwed up.
Then they would update it, then something else would be broken.
The Linux mint 13, and 14 runs everything I'm tried so far.
I put a bunch of my Office Docs on it and the LibreOffice works great.
It has a similar word, and excel and Powerpoint program.
It was all preloaded.
There is tons of different linux software you can load.
I'm running the mint 14 Beta, and it does daily updates, getting it closer to the official version when it comes out.
The dual boot thing is ok, but Your usually never on the right OS, when you do it that way.
It had been 2 weeks since I''ve run windows.
I booted it up yesterday, and it took over 30 minutes, before I could use it.
It had to run updates on everything, including the virus scan.
I fired the linux back up and it runs circles around the windows 7 loaded on the hard drive.
Looks like for recording, you would want a dedicated windows desktop for that.
Then use a cheap laptop with a wireless router, to surf the web.
Just a thought.
T
 
Steve A. 11/16/2012 12:42 AM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
Looks like for recording, you would want a dedicated windows desktop for that.
I've always used a dedicated computer for recording and my all-purpose Windows machine for editing and mixing (the stuff that doesn't need real time accuracy.)

Thx

Steve
 
big_teee 11/16/2012 7:46 AM
Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
I've always used a dedicated computer for recording and my all-purpose Windows machine for editing and mixing (the stuff that doesn't need real time accuracy.)

Thx

Steve
Sounds like a nice setup.
We need Pictures!
On the linux, I meant to comment earlier.
One of the install options, is to encrypt the /Home folder.
Each User has a Home folder account.
So I guess everything in that folder is encrypted, or maybe just the access to the folder is encrypted.
I haven't tried that option yet, but think I will next time I do an install.
Does anyone that's running linux use a encrypted home account?
Any thoughts?
T
 
km6xz 11/28/2012 12:31 AM
Mu own journey with Ubuntu

I am certainly not a Linux expert, but find that some distros have matured to the point that it really is a full replacement in an office environment for Windows. I played with early versions years ago but never got into it much. in 2009 and into 2010 my office had grown with a network that had a bizarre mix of Windows versions in 2 languages. The main file server died in 2009, we had it running Windows Server 2003. It was OK but not fast on the hardware it was on. I built up a machine as a new server and tried Linux again. This time Ubuntu Server which was installed as a dumb server, only console control, no graphical interface. I had never done that before but the web was a big help. It not only worked perfectly but in comparison, it screamed. And never went off-line. The software police unannounced visit to check our office computers, they are paid by Microsoft to catch people running unlicensed versions of their products. Here in Russia it is almost impossible to get a legal copy of English Windows so they found a copy of Office on one machine and confiscated all the English Windows machines, even though all but one were legal copies with OEM versions that came with them(since they were bought in the US, I did not know that the license did not extend outside of the US) in the office including my lap top since I could not prove on the spot that I bought it new in the US with a OEM version installed. I had to scramble to replace 8 computers and my laptop just at the beginning of my busiest season. My excellent results with Ubuntu Server 9.04 gave me an opportunity to get all the machines in the office (28) on the same OS at the same upgrade status and keep that way. Over a 3 day holiday, I had access to all the computers and no one a was there to get in the way. I saved personal documents, for each computer to the server, their Outlook PST files were already on the server and wiped all of them clean and installed Ubuntu on 28 desktops with all sorts of hardware but nothing very exotic. I knew the staff who ranged from tech savvy young girls to 55 year old technophobe women, would be shocked by not having windows so I had to learn Open Office quickly so I could answer their questions. That was version 10.04 LTS, and all were set for auto update. There was some grumbling about the different interface but within a couple days, all was normal. The surprising thing was the older workers who were afraid of anything new took to it in stride with no complaints. Two years later I can say that Ubuntu has lowered the cost of computing, greatly increased reliability, made even the oldest machines fly, everyone likes it. Techies grumbled about Unity interface but the girls in the office like it. The user interface is slick, polished and well thought out. Updates keep the machines current and trouble free and the life of the machines have been extended. My laptop is the only Windows/Ubuntu dual boot machine because I have some programs that do not work well in VMWare or Wine. Windows 7 is really pretty good. I particularly like LibreOffice, it just works very well, looks nice and is mature. I have some graphic editing suites like the GIMP but still do most of mine in Adobe Photoshop CS6 on Windows. All my PHP coding is done with a Windows editor as is my web development.
The best part has been how good Ubuntu handles ALL the hardware drivers with ease, no problems with any device plugged in, including the 6 different model wireless adapters used by the 28 desktops. We finally got the old computers back from the software police even though we did not pay the $25,000 bribe they wanted to get them back. I just sued them and just before it was to go to trial, they brought them back. We did not need then so it was not worth anything to buy them back, all the real data was safe in the server which was backed up by my Ubuntu Cloud dedicated server in NYC out of the country. We have gradually switched most office custom applications to run as services on the Ubuntu Cloud, that way smart phones and tablets can run all the office systems from anywhere. I can process a booking or create tour tickets on my Samsung Galaxy S3 while walking in the park...So, count me on a big fan of Linux on the Desktop.
 
Jazz P Bass 11/28/2012 7:33 AM
The 'Software Police'?
Give me a break.
This planet is f*cked up!
Make a good name for a thrash band though.
 
big_teee 11/28/2012 8:17 AM
I named the thread Ubuntu.
I've actually moved on to Linux Mint 14.
It is IMO a wonderful OS, and has a great user friendly desktop.
I have my desktop configured, very similar to XP.
Mint 14 loads easily, and everything works.
Very fast, comes with a nice office suite.
It doesn't have all the aggrevations associated with Microsoft Windows.
Give it a try. I run the Mate desktop version.
Did I mention, It's Free!
Main Page - Linux Mint
T
 
km6xz 11/28/2012 11:56 AM
Russia established an "economic crimes unit just for software piracy because it was demanded by the US(Microsoft) before Russia was allowed to join the WTO. Each member country gets to demand conditions and concessions.
So pirated software carry some big penalties, particularly for a business, that can be shut down while an investigation is conducted, even if nothing is found. The only thing they are required to look for is Microsoft software. Kiosks in every underground pedestrian crossing used sell CDs and DVDs full of compilations of software for 50 Rubles, (about $1.50) on a theme such as graphics, or C++ and 50 programs or more. All that was confiscated over a weekend when the order came from WTO to stop piracy before the final ratification meeting. By that time however, sales were weak since everyone had all they wanted. Then came bit torrent...... I doubt many people are using pirated Windows OS here because now it comes free on every laptop and desktop. I am happy with all my machines are Linux except my i7 laptop has Ubuntu in serveral versions plus Windows 7.
I've tried different flavors but keep coming back to Ubuntu. Adding up the 28 desktops, 1 server, my home office 2 machines, plus 3 laptops all running one version of an OS updated automatically, it sure is easier to keep everything working.
 
Steve A. 11/28/2012 7:46 PM
Quote Originally Posted by km6xz View Post
Russia established an "economic crimes unit just for software piracy because it was demanded by the US(Microsoft) before Russia was allowed to join the WTO. Each member country gets to demand conditions and concessions.
Evidently that rule was not required for China to gain Most Favored Nation status as they are the king of bootlegs... The Ukraine finally cracked down on Demonoid last June under pressure from the US.
 
big_teee 2/1/2013 9:54 AM
Like a Drunk making AA meetings!
I can declare that I am Windoz Free!
I've gone 3 Months without a single Windows Event.
No XP, No Win7!
Free, Free at Last!
B_T
 
Steve Conner 2/3/2013 3:23 AM
All of the Linux distros out there are basically "skins". They all share the same Linux kernel and drivers. There are two rival package managers, and a whole zoo of window managers. Worst of all, so far Linux has had three sound systems, and as far as I know none of them has been good enough to run a DAW.

The Chinese might be kings of pirate software consumption, but the Russians are excellent hackers and much better at producing it. That may have something to do with the WTO crackdown.

My opinion is that free software is now so good that it's hardly worth stealing the paid stuff.
 
big_teee 2/3/2013 5:08 AM
There are 4+ package mangagers.
Debian, Ubuntu based use apt-get.
Fedora, Redhat, use yum, & OpenSuse runs Zypper.
Slackware, which I don't use often has a 4th, and think there is another or 2.
Just reloaded my Wifes old Compaq Presario last week with Mint 14, 32bit.
It had an ailing copy of XP on it, and the wireless was very slow.
I made her Mate Desktop, look a lot like XP.
It is now running about 2-3 times as fast, and the wireless is working great.
She Loves it. Said it was much easier to run than the Windows.
I currently run 2 different versions on my PCs, Mint, and OpenSuse.
If you like Gnome, and I do for Websurfing, I like the OpenSuse the best.
It uses the Zypper Package commands, and is very fast.
http://software.opensuse.org/developer/en
T
 
big_teee 2/5/2013 1:31 AM
Here's a pretty good cheat sheet that shows the different Package Management commands for different Linux Distros.
These are commands from Terminal Command line.
DistroWatch.com: Put the fun back into computing. Use Linux, BSD.
It's really not as complicated as it appears.
If I can do it, most anyone can!
T
 
big_teee 3/2/2013 10:30 AM
I downloaded "Caixa Magica", another fine version of Ubuntu.
It is a full featured OS, like Ubuntu, and Linux Mint, but uses the 3.6 Gnome Desktop.
It comes with LibreOffice, compatible with MS Office.
If you like Gnome for a desktop, I recommend this one.
It uses the same Debian based Software update commands. (APT-GET)
So anything that can be downloaded and installed to Ubuntu, can also be installed on "Caixa Magica".
Distribution Release: Linux Caixa Mágica 19 (DistroWatch.com News)
 
bob p 3/3/2013 11:20 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Steve Conner View Post
My opinion is that free software is now so good that it's hardly worth stealing the paid stuff.
I agree completely. For web, email, CD burning and office applications the linux platform has been mature for a long time. I've been Windows-free since some time in the late 1990s, can't remember exactly when. My only Windependence exception is that I have kept an obsolete Win98 box around just so I can run TurboTax once a year. I considered it a major asspain when TurboTax stopped supporting Win98 a few years ago and made me upgrade to XP -- just so I could run ONE program.

The audio system is still a major achilles heel for Linux systems. Just as soon as they get it fixed, they change something and break it all over again.
 
Steve Conner 3/4/2013 4:37 AM
Bob P, you should maybe try making an XP virtual machine to run TurboTax.

I've been using VirtualBox a lot lately. I just got a new machine at work with Win7, but I had already made an XP virtual machine preinstalled with all of my weird obsolete software that I need for embedded development. The changeover was seamless, and it runs pretty fast. VirtualBox can intercept all the USB programming/debugging dongles I use, and pass them through to the virtual machine. As a bonus, I can run the exact same VM on my Mac laptop if I need to go and debug stuff in the field.

For another project, we are collaborating with a team who use Linux, so I just made another VM with the same Linux distro they use on their embedded hardware. I'm designing a USB data acquisition card for them, and I'll test it using VirtualBox's USB capability.

Oh and VirtualBox is free.
 
bob p 3/4/2013 5:42 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Steve Conner View Post
Bob P, you should maybe try making an XP virtual machine to run TurboTax.
virtualization is a good idea. i've been tinkering with virt-manager on linux for quite some time. first there was that hurdle with USB device recognition, then with securely virtualizing network connections. now it's sound. one thing that's always bothered me is that sound always seems to be b0rked in the linux virtual machines. so the path of least resistance has been to leave a win box up and running, so i don't have to fight with a b0rken OS every time I need to do my taxes.

Do you get full support for sound in virtualbox?

I have to admit, after seeing what Oracle did with Solaris, I can't say that I trust them to maintain open source solutions.
 
Steve Conner 3/5/2013 6:07 AM
Sound support: Playback works fine, to the extent that I can happily edit audio in Sound Forge on my Mac. I haven't dared to try recording. Since I moved to Win7 as the host, I get error messages saying that it couldn't find "PCM_In" or "PCM_Mic", which don't exactly fill me with confidence.

If you have a USB soundcard, you could always pass it through to the guest OS, which should take the host OS out of the picture completely. My best audio interface is Firewire, so I'm sort of lost there.

I think the free version of Virtualbox is a taster designed to get you interested in enterprise deployments of it, which will cost a fine fee.
 
big_teee 3/5/2013 9:16 AM
I tried downloading GNU-Cash yesterday.
I'm no book keeper, but I didn't see much for taxes.
It used up quite a bit of Drive, so I removed it.
All of thoseReal Tax programs seem to be Windoz only, maybe some Mac.
All the Debian, Ubuntu based (APT-GET) systems seem to have more options than the other Linux Systems.
Can someone explain the Virtual Box Concept? I know nothing about it.
Also does anyone use the Wine? I've not used any of that either.
T
 
Steve Conner 3/6/2013 3:17 AM
Big Tee, the idea is to create another virtual computer inside your real one, so you can run two OSs at once. This used to be slow and clunky, but modern hardware is so powerful that you can't tell the difference between the virtual machine and the real one. In some situations the virtual machine can even be faster.

So, at work I run Win7 as my host OS and that lets me join the corporate network (it's secured so only authorised computers can connect) use MS Office 2013, MS Project, Outlook, surf the net and so on.

But inside it I run a stripped down copy of XP or Linux to get my software development work done. These guest OSs don't need to access the Internet, so they can run without virus checkers, web browsers etc, which makes them smaller and faster. Also, if they get corrupted for whatever reason, I can restore their virtual hard disks to a known good state. Unlike "System Restore", this really works. I can also move the virtual machines to any other computer running VirtualBox.

I have a dual monitor setup, and it works nicely with one OS on each.

Wine is a little different. Instead of creating a whole new machine, it's just a library that converts the Windows functions into the corresponding X-Windows ones. So when your Windows program wants to pop up a dialog box, it might call the MessageBox function. That wouldn't normally exist in *nix, so Wine provides it, and translates it into a call to whatever the equivalent function is in *nix.
 
km6xz 3/6/2013 7:52 AM
The only reason I still have my main computer running Win 7(which actually works very well) is Adobe products such as Photoshop CS6, Premiere Pro CS6, InDesign and DreamWeaver CS6. Wine works with earlier versions of Photoshop but there were enough compatibility issues that I gave up on Wine. Virtual Box is much more flexible and faster, allows full access to ports etc but the down side is you still are running an install of Windows. For some applications, Wine is well tuned and allows you to stay in your Linux OS but less popular Windows programs are not well supported.

What really impresses me more than any other feature is how wide a range of hardware now runs out of the box on Ubuntu. It has been quite a few versions back that the last time I ran into a wireless adapter driver issue, webcam or scanner issue. In an office environment where there are not too many multimedia external devices or games, it would be hard to find a hardware device that was not supported out of the box plain vanilla Ubuntu. I am using Ubuntu 12.10 on my dual boot laptop, plus a couple others to play with including Mint.
 
Steve A. 3/6/2013 10:12 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Steve Conner View Post
So, at work I run Win7 as my host OS and that lets me join the corporate network (it's secured so only authorised computers can connect) use MS Office 2013, MS Project, Outlook, surf the net and so on.

But inside it I run a stripped down copy of XP or Linux to get my software development work done. These guest OSs don't need to access the Internet, so they can run without virus checkers, web browsers etc, which makes them smaller and faster. Also, if they get corrupted for whatever reason, I can restore their virtual hard disks to a known good state. Unlike "System Restore", this really works. I can also move the virtual machines to any other computer running VirtualBox.
VirtualBox sounds really cool- it is free software evidently from Oracle (not just some hacker in his basement.) I keep putting off doing a dual boot Win/Linux thing but I learned here that it isn't very fast switching back and forth. (Probably take close to 5 minutes with a loaded Win 7 install.)

Thanks!

Steve Ahola

Here is a link to the Virtual Box download page:

https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads

BTW can you explain more about the virtual hard drive?
 
Steve Conner 3/7/2013 4:35 AM
When you're making your virtual machine, you have to set it up with some virtual hard drives, so it has something to boot off. As far as the guest OS is concerned, these appear like real hard drives connected to IDE or SATA controllers. To the host OS they are just large ".vhd" files. Luckily, these files only get as big as the space you've actually used on the virtual disk. At any time, you can "snapshot" them: the currently used .vhd files are frozen and a new set are created that will store any future changes. You can then ask for a rollback at which point VirtualBox just deletes the new files and goes back to using the old ones.

Typically, if you wanted to install an OS in VirtualBox, here's what you would do:

Create a new virtual machine. VirtualBox suggests settings for popular guest OSs such as XP or Linux. The suggested settings seemed to work fine for me.

If you have a physical install CD (like XP) then put it in your CD drive and tell VirtualBox to attach the CD drive to your virtual machine. Start the virtual machine, and it will boot off the CD and run the XP installer. This will detect the virtual machine's virtual hard drive, format it and install itself.

If you downloaded an ISO image of an install CD or DVD (Ubuntu etc) then it works just the same except VirtualBox can mount the ISO directly. To the virtual machine it looks like a CD or DVD drive with a disk in it.

The virtual hard disk files are no good for communication between the host and guest OSs. But VirtualBox also supports "shared folders". A directory in the host filesystem can be mounted as a network drive in the guest OS.

Note: I used VirtualBox as an example, but the process is pretty much the same with VMWare.
 
big_teee 3/12/2013 3:20 PM
Quote Originally Posted by km6xz View Post
The only reason I still have my main computer running Win 7(which actually works very well) is Adobe products such as Photoshop CS6, Premiere Pro CS6, InDesign and DreamWeaver CS6. Wine works with earlier versions of Photoshop but there were enough compatibility issues that I gave up on Wine. Virtual Box is much more flexible and faster, allows full access to ports etc but the down side is you still are running an install of Windows. For some applications, Wine is well tuned and allows you to stay in your Linux OS but less popular Windows programs are not well supported.

What really impresses me more than any other feature is how wide a range of hardware now runs out of the box on Ubuntu. It has been quite a few versions back that the last time I ran into a wireless adapter driver issue, webcam or scanner issue. In an office environment where there are not too many multimedia external devices or games, it would be hard to find a hardware device that was not supported out of the box plain vanilla Ubuntu. I am using Ubuntu 12.10 on my dual boot laptop, plus a couple others to play with including Mint.
If you haven't tried this one, you owe it to yourself to load it on something.
Either try it on a DVD, or stick it on a USB.
It is the best version I've tried with the Gnome Desktop.
Distribution Release: Linux Caixa Mágica 19 (DistroWatch.com News)
It is the only Ubuntu base I've found that has the 3.6 Gnome desktop.
It has all the codecs, and is a pretty full system, w/LibreOffice.
I alternate between Mint 14 with Mate desktop, and the Caixa with Gnome.
T
 
km6xz 3/14/2013 1:34 PM
On your recommendation I created a USB image of Caixa Magica and tried it. I have come to like Unity so I am not angry at Ubuntu like so many are, but Gnone 3.6 is really nice, slick and polished. I'll play with it for a while and show it to some in the office and if there is general agreement to switch I'll switch all 28 desktops after our tour season is over at the end of September. I can't make a big change now because we are in the peak of summer booking and general panic would sweep the office if anything looked different.
 
big_teee 3/14/2013 1:45 PM
Quote Originally Posted by km6xz View Post
On your recommendation I created a USB image of Caixa Magica and tried it. I have come to like Unity so I am not angry at Ubuntu like so many are, but Gnone 3.6 is really nice, slick and polished. I'll play with it for a while and show it to some in the office and if there is general agreement to switch I'll switch all 28 desktops after our tour season is over at the end of September. I can't make a big change now because we are in the peak of summer booking and general panic would sweep the office if anything looked different.
Cool.
I really liked Ubuntu, except for the Left closing desktop.
I never could get used to the X being on the top left.
All the others the X is on the right like windows.
That is why I fell in love with Mint, you can make the desktop look just like XP classic, with the benefits of Linux.
For just web surfing I kindof prefer the Gnome with it all at the top.
Once you break the mind set of windoz, I don't think I can ever go back!
T
 
Steve A. 3/14/2013 2:05 PM
So is the main difference between the various flavors of Linux mainly cosmetic, dealing with the desktop and user interface since they all have the same engine (right?) Or does it have to do with support of peripherals, codecs and shit like that which is more operational than cosmetic.
FWIW one of my big complaints about Windows 7 is how it works with my Logitech trackball- very erratic and jumpy. It works much more smoothly with WinXP. Another complaint is the user interface in Windows Explorer and how it deals with searches on your hard drive. So the user interface is important to me...) In terms of stability Win 7 might be better than WinXP but I find that it handicaps so many of the things I do on a daily basis that might not be important to other people like moving files around and organizing them as well as extensive editing and processing of audio files.

Steve Ahola
 
big_teee 3/14/2013 2:22 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
So is the main difference between the various flavors of Linux mainly cosmetic, dealing with the desktop and user interface since they all have the same engine (right?) Or does it have to do with support of peripherals, codecs and shit like that which is more operational than cosmetic.
FWIW one of my big complaints about Windows 7 is how it works with my Logitech trackball- very erratic and jumpy. It works much more smoothly with WinXP. Another complaint is the user interface in Windows Explorer and how it deals with searches on your hard drive. So the user interface is important to me...) In terms of stability Win 7 might be better than WinXP but I find that it handicaps so many of the things I do on a daily basis that might not be important to other people like moving files around and organizing them as well as extensive editing and processing of audio files.

Steve Ahola
Your pretty close.
What I recommend you try is to burn a DVD.
Then boot up temporarily on the DVD, and just see how your system runs on it.
I do that all the time, I load different ones to see how they work on my hardware.
First you need to know if you have 32 bit, or 64 bit system.
A 64 bit system will run on 32 bit, but not the other way around.
I stick with the 64bit on my stuff, because I have newer hardware and the 64 bit is faster.
The one I would recommend is Mint 14 32 bit.
http://www.mirrorservice.org/sites/w...-dvd-32bit.iso
Download to a folder, then burn the iso to a DVD.
Then when you boot your system, make sure the system will boot from CD before the hard drive.
Give it a spin.
 
bob p 3/14/2013 3:42 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
So is the main difference between the various flavors of Linux mainly cosmetic, dealing with the desktop and user interface since they all have the same engine (right?) Or does it have to do with support of peripherals, codecs and shit like that which is more operational than cosmetic.
Unfortunately, the answer to both questions is a qualified yes. The superficial variations are mostly cosmetic, but the different flavors of linux (aka "distributions") will differ in terms of things like:

- what kernel version they use
- what display manager they're using
- what software is supported by the distribution
- which versions of software are supported in each release

The kernel is the basic "engine" of the operating system.
The display manager is the "skin" that's used to provide the GUI in the windowing environment. Two popular windows-like GUIs are KDE and Gnome.

There's a site called "distrowatch.org" that maintains tables of the variations of all of these thigns between different linux distributions and the different version updates, or "releases" within each "distribution" (brand). It's very helpful when it comes to making decisions about what "flavor" of linux might work best for you.

I wouldn't go so far as to say that all versions of linux are equal. Making the wrong choice could be a frustrating experience that would cause a lot of hardship for you. So doing some research is definitely required.


If you want something that is stable that doesn't change all the time, the gold standard is RedHat. With RedHat you have to pay for support. There are free distributions that are essentially re-branded versions of RedHat. These are called CentOS and Scientific Linux. CentOS is basically a free version of RedHat, and Scientific Linux is another free version of RedHat that's maintained by the nuclear research people at CERN. Scientific Linux has become a worldwide standard for scientific computing environments where people want to rely upon a free OS that is stable and doesn't have to be changed/revised/updated all the time. RedHat, CentOS and Scientific are very compatible with old hardware. Compared to the leading-edge distributions: they will all have older versions of the free software; they will have older versions of the kernel; they are more stable and are less likely to be plagued by development bugs. But the older kernels may not support the latest hardware devices, and the older software may not have the latest features that you might want. The support life for these distributions is measured in years. That means that when you perform an installation, the OS will be maintained/supported for a period of years and you shouldn't be forced into putting a new OS on your box for a LONG time.

This means that if your computing environment is based on older hardware (ie: you're not worried about using brand-new cutting-edge hardware that requires the most current driver support), then one of these more "stable" distributions might be good for you.

Compare that to the newer leading edge distributions. They tend to offer more current kernels, which means more recent hardware drivers are built-in. They tend to offer more current software, which means more bells and whistles are available for you. But they are more prone to having transient bugs that appear in the newer software, and you'll be required to perform updates frequently so that you have the latest updates to the OS (and bug fixes) on your system. The leading edge distros also have a very short support lifespan, which is typically measured in months instead of years. If you want "bleeding edge" instead of leading edge, one option is Fedora. It's basically the "beta testing" version of leading edge linux that's published by the RedHat people. It tends to offer the most leading-edge features and fastest product development of any of the linux distributions because RedHat has paid developers working on RedHat and Fedora. The pace of development is fast, bugs come and go fast, and the distribution has a short lifespan, with a new version coming out every 6 months. If you want to run cutting edge hardware, you might want Fedora.

Personally, I run CentOS or Scientific on machines that I deploy as servers because these systems offer the most consistent/non-changing software configuration interfaces and provide the best ease of administration over the long haul. My focus on these boxes is stability, where I plan to build the system with the intent that it will run for years without needing any maintenance or updates.

I build a new desktop PC every year or so, and with rapidly changing hardware requirements, I need to keep a leading-edge distribution installed to provide compatibility with the latest hardware. For my personal and hobbyist use I've found that Fedora is the most up to date and offers the best new hardware compatibility. As an example, I built an octo-core AMD box using a brand-new ASUS USB 3.0 motherboard around thanksgiving. It has the new UEFI type of BIOS, and at the time Fedora was the ONLY linux distribution that could even recognize/boot the motherboard. Every other linux distribution that I tried at the time failed to boot.

I had been a user of Ubuntu (Kubuntu) for the desktop, and Ubuntu Server for server builds, for a period of years prior to moving to CentOS and Fedora. But I won't go near any of the debian-based distributions any more. I severed all ties with Ubuntu when I found that the distribution refused to fix bugs in their "Long Term Support" release; instead of providing long term support they demanded that users migrate to "short term support" releases to obtain bug-fixes. At that time I also documented some spyware behavior that was built into Ubuntu Server, so I walked away from Ubuntu (actually, I ran away as fast as I could) and I've never looked back.

I hope this helps you find your way through the maze that is linux. Good luck.
 
big_teee 3/14/2013 4:10 PM
I Agree with most of what Bob says.
Red hat used to be the number one downloaded Linux.
It and other versions of red hat are mainly used for Servers.
The number one downloaded Linux Desktop by a wide margin is Linux Mint.
The reason, is it works, and is very easy to load and use.
Mint with the Mate desktop, can be configured to look just like XP Classic.
That is what I have loaded for my wife, and she migrated from XP to mint without a hitch.
Mint runs on Ubuntu, and there is by far more software available for Ubuntu based Linux, than any other.
Mint 14 is Downloaded 3745 times a day. There is a reason for this, it works and people like it.
Fedora that is the open source version of Red Hat is downloaded 1614 times a day.
Mint and Ubuntu is by far the most user friendly, and is IMO a better choice for new Crossover Linux Users.
But, feel free to try whatever you like.
In the last 6 months, I've tried probably 50 different Distros, and Mint is by far the easiest to load & use, and has more software choices.
Here is distro watch.
DistroWatch.com: Put the fun back into computing. Use Linux, BSD.
Look halfway down the page on the right side.
It lists the top 100 downloaded Linux Distros, and how many times a day they are downloaded.
T
 
bob p 3/14/2013 5:26 PM
I think that those counters at distrowatch refer to the number of times each day that each distribution's info page is served-up by the distrowatch servers. To my knowledge, the number only counts how many page hits each distribution gets every day at the distrowatch site. It doesn't reflect how many times the distribution is actually downloaded. Either way, I think that information still gives a decent measure of a distribution's popularity.

I tried using Mint recently just out of curiosity. My personal opinion is that it was a nice setup for crossover users who don't mind bloated software installations, and are looking something that installs with almost everything (codec installs, etc) already done for you. I had some major compatibility problems, where the stuff was just broken on install, so I just wiped the install and installed something else that actually worked.

If you're looking for a "crossover" distribution then I think that Ubuntu and Mint should be on your short list of things to try out. As with most distributions you're more likely to run into driver problems if you're using really new hardware.
 
big_teee 3/14/2013 7:42 PM
I've yet to find any machine that ubuntu, or mint won't load on.
I went right on my wife's old IDE Laptop, I had to find a driver for the Wifi adapter.
The only way Linux will ever really take a foot hold and get to be accepted by the real public, is if it gets easier to use.
One of the main problems with it for the last 10 years, is that the Linux Hack, didn't want it to be easy or really accepted.
Another good Distro that is really gaining ground, is Open Suse.
It has a pretty good version of Gnome.
I also like the Caixa Magica, it is a real polished distro.
It has all the Codecs pre loaded also.
You have to be careful with it, or you'll load the wrong language.
It comes in a bunch of them.
Years ago, I ran Mandrake, then it became Mandriva, it went commercial like Redhat, and now they have the Mageia Open Source version.
I don't like the Urpmi Package manager they use.
Fedora uses Yum, I like it OK, but I didn't like the Fedora Install and Partition Program.
Distro Watch didn't like the fedora install either, they gave it a bad review on the last Fedora Distro Issue.
The main thing, whatever works the best for you.
All of it IMO Beats The Hell out of WINDOZ.
T
 
bob p 3/14/2013 9:55 PM
I'm what you'd call an "early adopter."

I used to publish my own linux distribution (a renegade derivative of Gentoo), which I built from source code. It was a lot of fun, but very time consuming.

Years before that I had started off trying Mandrake, as it really was tailored for n00bs and I was... well... a total n00b. With Mandrake it just wasn't possible to get the i810 video to work. This was back in the era when the Mandrake video drivers weren't friendly with the i810 on-board video cards in Dell boxes and the system would always do video lockups. SuSE had video drivers that worked, so for a while I just ran SuSE kernels on Mandrake boxes to circumvent Mandrake's poor driver support. Eventually it was easier to just move over to SuSE. This was long before SuSE was taken private. Then I went to Ubuntu and stayed there for many years. I grew very tired of what I thought was poorly organized development, where there wasn't enough top-down oversight of what people were doing. Eventually I found my way to Gentoo, which is a largely overlooked distribution. It had the best package manager available, and provided superior granularity for package version control. I stayed with Gentoo for many years ... and I ended up writing white papers on methods for building linux from scratch, which completely changed the way that Gentoo came to be built & distributed. I stayed there for a long time ... eventually becoming one of the distribution's elder advocates. Eventually I just got fed up with always having an entire distributed compiling farm runing in my house 24/7/365. Having a dozen computers performing distributed compiling consumed a boatload of electricity and generated an awful lot of heat. I eventually migrated to Fedora once it became evident to me that almost every linux distirbution's development staff just copied the majority of Fedora's development work. From a development standpoint, Fedora has always been the leader. All of the other linux distributions, from Gentoo to SuSE, to Ubuntu ended up copying more of their code from Fedora than their developers wrote on their own. No quesiton about it, Fedora is shaping the evolution of the linux standard more than anyone else. Everyone else is just re-packaging. There are an awful lot of "me too" distributions in linux today.

The installer for Fedora used to be quite good. but it was old enough that the code was obsolete and difficult to maintain. With F18 they decided to do a complete rewrite, so the installer is now a totally new software project, and it's going through some growing pains as they go through the rewrite. To avoid problems with the installer, I just don't use it. My own preference is to just perform an absolute minimal command line linux installation over VNC and once I have a command line interface, I emerge only the packages that I want. Having built linux from scratch literally thousands of times, doing this is a no-brainer for me, so I don't even consider using the bloated "crossover" distributions. I prefer to build stuff the way I want it, and for me that means nothing unnecesary being installed on the system. I hate bloat.
 
big_teee 3/15/2013 4:23 PM
Today I downloaded the latest issue of UberStudent Linux.
I haven't loaded it on anything yet.
Thought I would try it, and see if it may be something my Grand-daughter would like.
Development Release: UberStudent 2.10 (DistroWatch.com News)
I'll let you know how it works out.
 
big_teee 3/15/2013 7:14 PM
I loaded it on a USB Flash drive.
It loaded, and I had sound and no video.
So the 2.6gb file I downloaded was a waste of time, and was a no go!
T
 
big_teee 3/25/2013 5:15 PM
I downloaded and installed the new Linux Mint Debian Distribution, 201303.
It is based on Debian, no Ubuntu.
It is supposed to be more of a true linux, than the Ubuntu, that is also based on Debian.
It seems to be faster, but looks very similar to Mint 14.
Here's the release Announcement.
The Linux Mint Blog » Blog Archive » Linux Mint Debian 201303 released!

IMO both Current Linux Mints (Linux Mint 14, and Linux Mint Debian LMDE) are the best, and in a league of there own.
 
big_teee 4/23/2013 8:58 PM
Downloaded the new Fedora 19 Alpha 1 Beta release.
It ran OK in Live Mode.
So I tried to install it using the Fedora Installer.
Never did figure out how to partition the Drive using their Installation tool.
So I gave up.
Fedora can't seem to get their software down to normal Layman Users.
I thought the installer was bad on 18, so far it's worse on 19.
So unless you like Frustration, or your an Engineer, you may want to wait til they get the bugs out of 19.
Good Luck,
T
 
big_teee 4/27/2013 11:29 AM
Ubuntu 13.04 Official has been released.
There is the regular Ubuntu and all the Variations out this week.
Ubuntu
Edubuntu
Kubuntu---KDE
Xubuntu
Lubuntu
ubuntustudio
UbuntuKylin
Ubuntu Gnome 3.63 Desktop
I downloaded the Ubuntu Gnome version with the Gnome 3.63 Desktop.
Distribution Release: Ubuntu GNOME 13.04 (DistroWatch.com News)
It runs great!
Give one a try!
T
 
bob p 4/27/2013 12:22 PM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
Downloaded the new Fedora 19 Alpha 1 Beta release.
Fedora is a rapidly moving target. Upgrading means that you're going to have to deal with configuration changes, so it's always a PITA.

choosing an Alpha release is even worse -- not only do you subject yourself to the latest configuration changes, but you're also subjecting yourself to alpha-testing of software in development that is expected to be broken.

my personal preference is to avoid the Alpha and Beta Fedora releases unless you're interested in assisting with software development, or unless you've got brand new hardware that forces your hand because it just won't run on anything else. My experience is that the Alpha and Beta releases of Fedora are guaranteed headaches.
 
big_teee 4/27/2013 12:36 PM
IMHO all the Fedoras I've tried are way behind all the other Distros!
I realize that Bob and I greatly disagree on this.
He is an Engineer, I am a avid Intermediate Linux user.
All the versions I've used in the past 6 months are way behind most of them.
Most of the Debian Products are designed more for us users.
The Installer on the Fedora 18 Stable was trash also.
They just need to get an installer that the normal user can use.
I loaded the Ubuntu Gnome version real quick, in one stab.
18 took a long time for me to figure the partition tool out.
I never did get it to work on 19.
After I loaded 18, I didn't care for it and wiped it out and moved on!
So if you like Fedora, by all means go for it.
I don't!
I like all the Debian based stuff with the Apt-get commands.
Great stuff!
T
 
bob p 4/27/2013 12:56 PM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
IMHO all the Fedoras I've tried are way behind all the other Distros!
I realize that Bob and I greatly disagree on this.
He is an Engineer, I am a avid Intermediate Linux user.
I think we're more in agreement than you think.

Fedora is sort of a product development test version for RedHat. they make decisions on how to change things that will eventually become part of the industry standard. One side effect of doing that is that they tend to break things all the time. From an end-user's perspective that's one giant headache. I agree with you that Fedora, with it's 6-month lifecycle and continually changing configurations, is a really bad choice for most end-users.

If you're an end-user who wants something to work right out of the box, Ubuntu and it's derivatives are pretty good options. Debian? The stable branch is so outdated that it's lame.
 
big_teee 4/27/2013 1:09 PM
Quote Originally Posted by bob p View Post
I think we're more in agreement than you think.

Fedora is sort of a product development test version for RedHat. they make decisions on how to change things that will eventually become part of the industry standard. One side effect of doing that is that they tend to break things all the time. From an end-user's perspective that's one giant headache. I agree with you that Fedora, with it's 6-month lifecycle and continually changing configurations, is a really bad choice for most end-users.

If you're an end-user who wants something to work right out of the box, Ubuntu and it's derivatives are pretty good options. Debian? The stable branch is so outdated that it's lame.
I agree with everything you just said.
On the Debian, I run the Mint Debian.
Mint has two versions.
Linux Mint 14 based on Ubuntu.
Linux Mint 201313 "Debian"
More of a raw Debian with the Mint refinements.
Distribution Release: Linux Mint 201303 "Debian" (DistroWatch.com News)
I run both of them, and both with the Mate Desktop.
I do admit I like the Mint 14 version best.
T
**Bob, if you have a extra flash drive, you might want to load and try the Debian version.
And, tell us what you think?
 
big_teee 5/18/2013 12:30 PM
Linux Mint 15 RC(Release Candidate) has been released.
It is still based on the Ubuntu Distribution.
I have it loaded on a flash drive in a live version.
Haven't installed it on a Hard drive yet.
It looks very classy.
It has a new version of Mate desktop, and other updated programs.
It Also has the new 4.0.2 version of LibreOffice, Libre took the place of the old Open office.
I will install it on a hard drive soon, and will report back.
T

http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=07863
 
big_teee 5/19/2013 12:54 PM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
Linux Mint 15 RC(Release Candidate) has been released.
It is still based on the Ubuntu Distribution.
I have it loaded on a flash drive in a live version.
Haven't installed it on a Hard drive yet.
It looks very classy.
It has a new version of Mate desktop, and other updated programs.
It Also has the new 4.0.2 version of LibreOffice, Libre took the place of the old Open office.
I will install it on a hard drive soon, and will report back.
T

Development Release: Linux Mint 15 RC (DistroWatch.com News)
The best I've used so far.
It includes the Newer Linux Kernel 3.8.0.19-Generic
This version Has the New 1.6 Mate Desktop.
The Linux installer worked great.
It is currently a RC version, but as Polished as it, they should release the Stable version soon.
If you are looking for a Alternative to Windoz, that is Easy to run and use, and can be configured to look like Windows Classic desktop, this is it.
Did I mention it is Free!
Development Release: Linux Mint 15 RC (DistroWatch.com News)
IMHO for new Users that are Transitioning from Windows to Linux, Mint 14 & 15 puts all Other Linux Distributions to Shame.
 
DrGonz78 8/4/2013 3:08 AM
Yup Terry I finally did my install on a laptop with Linux Mint 15. Well I first thought to go with Mint 14 as it might have more solutions to any problems with hardware. So, I installed and found that Ndiswrapper has a big issue on that version at installation. So I did a bunch of command line problem solving uninstalled Ndiswrapper and reinstalled the latest version. Lots of fun Anyhow Ndiswrapper is a wrapper program to allow the OS to use proprietary hardware. In my case it was an intel wireless card built into the laptop. So, I kept at it but just could not get Ndiswrapper to work. So, I tried just Ubuntu and quickly ran away from that system as fast as I installed it! lol... I thought about and made a install disk for Mint 12 as I had reports from others that Ndiswrapper was working great on that version. I ended up not installing Mint 12...

Long story short... Too Late! I ended up just installing Mint 15 and Viola!!! It recognized my wireless card perfectly! So, to all that want to work with Linux or anyone who wants a developers type workstation, then this IS the way to go. Thank you Terry for being the one that turned me on to it!
~Jer
 
big_teee 8/4/2013 8:44 AM
Quote Originally Posted by DrGonz78 View Post
Yup Terry I finally did my install on a laptop with Linux Mint 15. Well I first thought to go with Mint 14 as it might have more solutions to any problems with hardware. So, I installed and found that Ndiswrapper has a big issue on that version at installation. So I did a bunch of command line problem solving uninstalled Ndiswrapper and reinstalled the latest version. Lots of fun Anyhow Ndiswrapper is a wrapper program to allow the OS to use proprietary hardware. In my case it was an intel wireless card built into the laptop. So, I kept at it but just could not get Ndiswrapper to work. So, I tried just Ubuntu and quickly ran away from that system as fast as I installed it! lol... I thought about and made a install disk for Mint 12 as I had reports from others that Ndiswrapper was working great on that version. I ended up not installing Mint 12...

Long story short... Too Late! I ended up just installing Mint 15 and Viola!!! It recognized my wireless card perfectly! So, to all that want to work with Linux or anyone who wants a developers type workstation, then this IS the way to go. Thank you Terry for being the one that turned me on to it!
~Jer
Glad it worked out/
I was running Mint on flash cards.
I recently put Mint 15 on the whole hard drive.
It works great for my web surfing, and my picture handling I do.
T
 
überfuzz 8/27/2013 9:39 AM
I kind of vent the other direction, seems most of us vent from Windows to Linux.

I used different distributions of Linux since the nineties (tried Window XP for a month or so but hated every minute of it). A couple of years ago I got a new laptop that had win7 pre-installed. As win7 was more or less a visual rip-off of KDE3 (yes I'm a KDE man) it didn't feel all that awkward. I decided not to make a clean re-installation but rather keep the win7 boot along with openSUSE at the time.

Nowadays I use win7 for Cubase, Star Craft 2 and occasionally other games. Windows is however not much to cheer about if you're a programmer. For that I need something more mature, like Linux.

Now a question, is there any nice Cubase like soft-ware(s) I should try?
 
T9c 10/4/2013 5:33 PM
Terry,
Thanks to your thread, reading about your distro trials I am enjoying Mint 15 with Mate desktop 32bit on my shop PC. Installed last night. I really needed something to view pdf schematics on with some leftover hardware I had on hand. I'm also planning on using it for a parts database and multimedia for the shop. I guess I'll find lots of uses here including the big one: networking with a couple of my Win7 boxes, which Mint 15 does very well, although some arcane changes have to be made to those Windoze network settings. Long ago, I had to spend many hours just getting the 3 W7 boxes to share files...it was rediculous.

Not exactly new to Linux. I ran Redhat, Mandrake and several others back in the 90's when you had to buy them in a store. I favored KDE over GNOME back then, so using Mint is pretty easy. I tried Kubuntu, and it was fine, but it had problems networking to the Windows network.

So far, Mint 15 is good, but I'd like a better pdf reader. Got any ideas?
 
bob p 10/4/2013 8:27 PM
if you don't like ocular then just emerge acrobat.
 
big_teee 10/4/2013 9:25 PM
I didn't have Acrobat either.
So I just did a search on the Mint Repository, and found it.
Here is the message to install it from command line in Terminal.
sudo apt-get install acroread
Sit back and relax, because it takes a while to install.
T
 
big_teee 10/22/2013 10:04 AM
Ubuntu issued the new 13.10 Release recently, called the Saucy Salamander.
I downloaded and tested the Kubuntu version with KDE.
It runs really fast, and everything seems to work well.
KDE Desktop has some similarity to the Windoze XP desktop.
They have fixed some of the things I didn't care for on KDE.
It is running the 3.9 kernel and has the latest 4.1.2.3 issue of LibreOffice.
It has very good screen resolution on my Hardware.
I still prefer Linux Mint 15 w/Mate Desktop, but Kubuntu is a fine Distribution.
You may want to give it a try?
http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=08114
Good Luck,
T
 
big_teee 10/22/2013 10:26 PM
I found a great Calculator with Memory functions.
It seems to be hard to find a calculator for Linux that has the memory function keys.
It also has all the regular and scientific modes.
It is called Galculator.
galculator - a GTK 2 / GTK 3 algebraic and RPN calculator
If you are running a ubuntu, mint, or debian based system?
It can be installed from terminal with this command.
sudo apt-get install galculator
 
philip12 1/12/2014 8:33 AM
Version 13.04 is the most stable Linux I have ever used.
 
silverfox 1/17/2014 7:47 PM
Ubuntu
I've installed Ubuntu 12.xx the LTS version. I just got to the point where I couldn't live with XP- even though it was somewhat stable.

Unfortunately in the experimental phase I installed it on a Flash Drive and haven't quite figured out how to move the installation to the hard drive without losing the programs installed. I've recently downloaded a program called remastersys which should allow me to do that- When I sit down for a day or two and figure out how to wipe the existing incorrectly partitioned and formatted HDA and then move the system over. I will keep the flash drive and occasionally update it when I get to that point.

My challenge with Ubuntu is first of all there seems to be some sort of unspoken understanding in the Linux forums that: all discussions must be highly intellectualized, sort of clickish.. The real problem is, in addition to all the other technical learning curves I've got going I now have to study an operating system in order to solve routine problems common to a novice user. For instance, I recently copied files from the Flash Drive to the HDA as a quick back up procedure. Strangely enough, some of the .pdf's won't open now as I do not seem to have the rights. The problem may lie in the format used to prep the drive?? I can't open the file on the HDA but if I copy it back to the Flash it opens with no problems.

I'm also having problems getting Audacity to find the USB mixer so I can record one of my Big Hit Tunes for y'all..

Not soliciting assistance here as that would change the course of the thread.

Silverfox.
 
big_teee 1/17/2014 11:42 PM
Quote Originally Posted by silverfox View Post
I've installed Ubuntu 12.xx the LTS version. I just got to the point where I couldn't live with XP- even though it was somewhat stable.

Unfortunately in the experimental phase I installed it on a Flash Drive and haven't quite figured out how to move the installation to the hard drive without losing the programs installed. I've recently downloaded a program called remastersys which should allow me to do that- When I sit down for a day or two and figure out how to wipe the existing incorrectly partitioned and formatted HDA and then move the system over. I will keep the flash drive and occasionally update it when I get to that point.

My challenge with Ubuntu is first of all there seems to be some sort of unspoken understanding in the Linux forums that: all discussions must be highly intellectualized, sort of clickish.. The real problem is, in addition to all the other technical learning curves I've got going I now have to study an operating system in order to solve routine problems common to a novice user. For instance, I recently copied files from the Flash Drive to the HDA as a quick back up procedure. Strangely enough, some of the .pdf's won't open now as I do not seem to have the rights. The problem may lie in the format used to prep the drive?? I can't open the file on the HDA but if I copy it back to the Flash it opens with no problems.

I'm also having problems getting Audacity to find the USB mixer so I can record one of my Big Hit Tunes for y'all..

Not soliciting assistance here as that would change the course of the thread.

Silverfox.
You're running older versions of ubuntu.
Try loading a newer version.
There are lots of good ubuntu versions out there, but stick to a current version.
Ubuntu is up to 13.10, or try Mint 16, it is another good Ubuntu derivative.
On the files you can't open, is because you don't have permissions to open them.
From Route user change the owner to your user account.
Or you can make your account an administrator account, which would give you the permission to open the files.
T
 
big_teee 1/20/2014 2:08 PM
I just purchased a new 500gb laptop drive from Newegg.
I also purchased a 2.5" SATA Hard drive enclosure.
I formatted 3 partitions, and loaded the new Mint 16 (Called Petra) on the first partition of the new drive.
I put my old drive in the enclosure and downloaded all the backup files from the old HD.
It all works slick, no surprises, and a very painless quick load.
T
 
big_teee 2/2/2014 8:59 PM
On my new hard drive with 3 partitions, I had already loaded mint 16 on Partition 1, and a large storage partition for files and music on partition 3, a few weeks ago.
I just put Kubuntu on partition 2 and now I can dual boot to either Mint 16, or Ubuntu KDE 14.04.
The Kubuntu with KDE is a bit harder to setup and customize, but is a good system once you get it like you want.
If I get tired of running one version of Linux, I boot to the other one.
DistroWatch.com: Kubuntu
T
 
big_teee 2/10/2014 1:24 PM
I Would Like to voluteer my Intermediate Linux level Services to anyone wanting to load Linux.
There are quite a few other Linux users here, that I'm sure would also offer help.
So, If you have any Linux questions, ask away.
I think most people will be surprised how easy Modern Linux is, and how easy it is to load, and run!
T
www.distrowatch.com
 
big_teee 4/12/2014 11:52 AM
Here's a link to the Ubuntu Group's Daily loads.
The Ubuntu group is woking on their new software constantly.
They produce daily loads for each of the five Linux desktop Distros they are currently working on.
These will have the latest updates, and changes, and the latest Kernel.
The Computer drivers are in the Kernel, so If you have a new computer, you may need a current Kernel to support it.
Of the 5 daily loads, my pick is Xubuntu, it is a no nonsense basic linux, with a traditional looking desktop.
Index of /
 
big_teee 4/19/2014 11:32 AM
The Ubuntu Group has just announced the Official Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.
The Beta trials for 14.04 are over and It was made Official on Friday 4-18-14.
This Issue will have Long term support for 5 years.
This includes Ubuntu, Edubuntu, Ubuntu Studio, Lubuntu, Kubuntu, Gubuntu, and Xubuntu.
The one that looks interesting for musicians is the Ubuntu Studio.
It has lots of music applications, and comes with the Fine Xfce Desktop.
Distribution Release: Ubuntu Studio 14.04 (DistroWatch.com News)
T
**Linux is less vulnerable to Virus, and Malware attacks.
Linux is kept current with daily updates, and Constant new evolving issues.
Most Linux comes with free Office Suite Software compatible with MS Office file types.
There are countless available software programs that are free downloads.
Last but not Least, Linux is FREE!
 
km6xz 4/20/2014 3:38 AM
I downloaded it and put it on a older machine in the other room that my GF uses sometimes when not using her laptop. It would not complete because the video adapter was unsupported, the latest that will run is 12.04 which is has on it. It is really only used to collect photos and for her Skype calls to family in Ukraine so I am not going to upgrade the machine.
In my office that is running 28 desktops on 13.04 and one server on 10.04 we have three additional machines with Windows 7, two laptops and the accountant's machine which is required to be Windows by our local bank. If there is any complaint, it is from two staff who get documents from agencies occasionally that come in .docx or xlsx format. About twice a month I am sent the files and I open them in my Office 2003 and save as doc or xls or ODT/ODS. No big deal.
Last week the company of which I am a minority owner, was taken over by a mysterious Russian "investor" who refuses to identify himself, who put two layers of managers between the company and himself. The original founder retired and sold his majority share. The new manager 32 year old woman who just came from a position in a large corporation and has no experience in either the field or in small or medium sized business needs every question or comment put into a report to go up the chain to unknown persons. She noticed that a girl in the office complained that some one sent an unreadable proprietary format xlsx. The new manager was shocked to to find out we were using a OS she never heard of and Office that was not MS Office and that started a round of high level but clueless discussions with people up the chain of command. She told me to prepare a report listing all the reasons for this breach of normalcy and how much time it would take and how much money was needed to correct this problem. I spend 2 days talking to vendors, comparing options, testing current computers to see if they were compatible with Windows 8.1....they are not since it requires NX and a few processor add ons. So the best price I was able to get was bare bone computers for 8000 rubles, office 2013 for 9000 rubles, Windows 8.1 for 9000 rubles for 28 desktop machines that have been flawless on Ubuntu for 3 and 1/2 years. This is less than 7 days before the start of our by far busiest part of the season preparing for 30,000 cruise passengers, their visas, scheduling, tickets for 24,000 museum and palace entrances all on specific appointment times, 60,000 lunches in restaurants etc.

I just finished the report and included a chart of time spent maintaining and repairing problems in the last 12 years....most of it made up since this is a relatively small business and small business does not have time for that type of bullshit reports....fix it before it breaks or immediately after but the fix it and not worry about because there are 15 different hats I wear. I went to Linux and problems with hardware, drivers(the bain of all windows users) and up time concerns just disappeared. Even if windows and office were free, they are still too expensive for a small organization with less than 50 employees. During the summer we have 150, mostly guides and drivers.
I added into the report that they would also have to add in a 60,000/mon computer specialist because I am not going to have the time to take care of all Russian language OS and Office since my Russian is not good enough to do it efficiently and it was never on my list of supervision duties in the first place, I did that, and the programming, repair and web sites and wrote the shopping cart only because no one else could, as typical in a small business.
So with 7 days left of relative calm I will be asked to set up 28 machines, figure out why each has a problem with some hardware driver, hire a specialist and suffer from dramatically higher problems overall with uptime, all because some oligarch with tons of money and no sense, who has never even seen a small business or office work decides Windows is better.
I think it is about time to dump this and go to repair full time and hire an additional tech. I have a great trainee now, a babe, 24 with a MSEE and eager to learn but I will need another body with some practical experience in mechanical systems, tools etc.
The problem is I never have and never will work FOR someone, even though I am an owner, my say, as the only person who knows everything about how the business works, is being ignored. We grew it from a start with 4 people(two employees and two owners) so obviously we knew something of how to grow a business to be dominate in a highly competitive field.
I concluded the report with a strong defense of not messing with what works very well by replacing it with something that costs an extra $100,000 the first year and and $30,000-to 60,000 each year after and ending up with a less reliable system. Plus added strong hints that I will likely start taking a lot of time off this season. I am not big into wasting my time writing reports that are ignored or even bothered with in the first place.

I just tried 14.04 as a ram drive boot on my laptop. Man, it loaded fast, desktop appeared in 18 seconds....from a slow USB2 port. Unity is more polished, it even found and loaded drivers for my 4g LTE modem without asking any questions, just popped with internet connection at 50mbs within that 18 seconds. This was not in the report but if anything 14.04 being an LTS is the sure way to go. I'll test more thoroughly....when I have time between "reports"
 
big_teee 4/20/2014 9:37 AM
New LibreOffice supports both the .xlsx, and .docx file types.
Looks like a linux upgrade would solve all your problems, and for a lot less Rubles!
T
 
km6xz 4/20/2014 11:02 AM
Thanks a lot, I guess I was thinking of the versions that I have used prior to V4. I just tried a fancy formatted XLSX file and it displayed the formatted shading and function results that would not work with my installed version.
I noticed another difference in the latest, copying tables to Word or Write now conforms to the Word style that had been a complaint by one staff member.
That will definitely go into my report. I will load 14.04 on one of the work positions as soon as I get to the office in the morning and let people play with it.
 
big_teee 4/20/2014 1:33 PM
I'm running the Xubuntu on a couple of laptops.
I drag the panel from the top to the bottom.
You can get all the latest Ubuntu's here.
Index of /
 
big_teee 4/21/2014 4:05 PM
Quote Originally Posted by km6xz View Post
Thanks a lot, I guess I was thinking of the versions that I have used prior to V4. I just tried a fancy formatted XLSX file and it displayed the formatted shading and function results that would not work with my installed version.
I noticed another difference in the latest, copying tables to Word or Write now conforms to the Word style that had been a complaint by one staff member.
That will definitely go into my report. I will load 14.04 on one of the work positions as soon as I get to the office in the morning and let people play with it.
Another selling point for your report, is the 14.04 5 year LTS support.
5 years for Software is a long time.
 
silverfox 4/30/2014 10:57 AM
Going to Install Ubuntu 14 or Mint 16
It looks like I will be installing either Ubuntu 14 or Mint 16. on the hard drive of the computer. I currently have an established partition structure on the hard drive as well as files that have a current ownership associated with them. I can afford to wipe the HDA.

Currently the operating system is running on a flash drive. If I install Mint or Ubuntu 14. on the hard drive will those files of previous ownership become my files up Mint installed?

Suggestions?

Silverfox.
 
big_teee 5/3/2014 6:49 AM
Quote Originally Posted by silverfox View Post
It looks like I will be installing either Ubuntu 14 or Mint 16. on the hard drive of the computer. I currently have an established partition structure on the hard drive as well as files that have a current ownership associated with them. I can afford to wipe the HDA.

Currently the operating system is running on a flash drive. If I install Mint or Ubuntu 14. on the hard drive will those files of previous ownership become my files up Mint installed?

Suggestions?

Silverfox.
When you say HDA?
Are You talking about being able to use the whole hard drive or just the first partition, windows partion A?
Will this be a dual boot computer, or just dedicated to Linux?
It will all depend on the computer, and the Partition Layout.
Did your computer come with Widows 8?
Does your computer use MBR for Master Boot Record, which is a Dos Boot record Partition Table.
Or, does your computer Use GPT Partition Table layout.
You can look at your partitions, with GPARTED Partition program.
If you don't have gparted loaded, you can install it on your linux system with the command:
sudo apt-get install gparted
Just be careful, You can add or delete partitions with this powerful partition tool.
Computers that come with Win 8 use the GPT partition structure, for the UEFI secure boot.
Feel free to ask questions, if none of this makes sense.
Here is some good reading on the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI), MBR vs GPT
Unified Extensible Firmware Interface - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Here are some examples of what you might see in Gpated, with gpt partitions.
https://www.google.com/search?q=show...w=1366&bih=572
Mint 16 does not currently support UEFI, so it will not work on a Windows 8 computer, when mint 17 comes out the end of May 2014, it will support UEFI.
The new 14.04 Ubuntus do support UEFI, and will work on win8 boxes.
So please gather all your info and come back.
GL,
T
 
silverfox 5/3/2014 6:22 PM
This will be a Clean Install
I have moved completely away from anything Windows. What I really need to end up with is some sort of multimedia editing system for a backing tracks project.

The laptop in question had Windows on it in the past but the drive has been wiped.

gparted is one of the programs I have installed.

Under Ubuntu, If I pick upgrade from the "software update aplet" will the upgrade option allow me to move the operating system from the Flash drive to the hardrive or is it going to want to upgrade the Flash only? Select the level of upgrade, 13? 14?

Aside from that I've been running Ubuntu 12- LTS and have a number of already installed programs in the Flash Drive. I could just dump all that and reinstall.

What will happen to the file ownership with the new installation. Will I be able to open files created with the current user, which the new operating system may know nothing about, or will the new operating system see that files that are copied to the hard drive are associated with a Linux user somewhere else in the IP Universe and refuse to open some of the .pdf files that seem to be directory location specific in order to open?- Ongoing ownership problem I'm hoping will go away with a fresh install.

So the hard drive is open. No special partition needs but security is much prefered. Probably a boot partition, swap partition and data partition is what I'll end up with.

Format types: Whatever makes sense for security.

Basically I'm just biting the bullet on this and have for the past 6 months. No Windows of any type and with the increased vulnarability even more so repulsed by Mr. Gate's multi billion dollar fraud.

Really need the multimedia editing capabilities and want imporved file security- If there is anything like that with the ptb.

Thanks for the suggestions,
Silverfox.
 
big_teee 5/3/2014 6:43 PM
What version of windows came on your Laptop?
What size of hard drive?
How much Ram do you have?
When you go into bios, under boot options, do you have secure boot, with enable, and disable capability?
T
 
bluto 5/3/2014 7:09 PM
An upgrade on the flash drive would do just that and would not install the new version to the HD...but in my personal experience and from what I've read there are usually far less problems in the long run if you install Ubuntu from scratch anyway, in fact Mint forces you to do new versions that way IIRC.
 
big_teee 5/3/2014 7:29 PM
I agree, I always had better luck with new loads, and upgrades usually take forever.
If you have a large enough hard drive, I always have a dual boot linux.
On my Lenovo, that came with Win7, I have secure boot disabled, and partitioned with DOS Partition table that uses MBR.
On it I have 3 partitions, Part-1 is mint 16, Part-2 is Xubuntu, and Part-3 is a Storage drive with all my files, and such.
So I can at anytime, load a new Linux version on Part-1, or Part-2, without disturbing my Documents, on Part. 3.
On a new Toshiba Laptop that came with Win 8.1, I had to do it different.
It has no enable or disable on the UEFI Secure boot.
So I have it setup with a gpt partition table, Part 1 is a Fat32 secure boot part. I have Ubuntu Studio on Part 2,
On Part 3 I have Ubuntu with Gnome Desktop , Part 4 & 5 are unequipped, ant Part 6 is Storage.
I don't use any Swap Partitions on any of my linux machines, except the old Compaq, because I have plenty of Ram, on the 3 newer laptops.
My Wifes New HP Laptop, is setup similar to the Toshiba, but is using Kubuntu as the main OS, I keep it updated for her.
On an Older Compaq Laptop, I am running Mint 16 32 Bit, with a MBR Dos Partion table, and On it I do have a Swap file Partition because of less RAM.
I will load Mint 17 on all of them when it is available.
T
 
big_teee 12/22/2014 11:23 AM
Quote Originally Posted by DrGonz78 View Post
Yup Terry I finally did my install on a laptop with Linux Mint 15. Well I first thought to go with Mint 14 as it might have more solutions to any problems with hardware. So, I installed and found that Ndiswrapper has a big issue on that version at installation. So I did a bunch of command line problem solving uninstalled Ndiswrapper and reinstalled the latest version. Lots of fun Anyhow Ndiswrapper is a wrapper program to allow the OS to use proprietary hardware. In my case it was an intel wireless card built into the laptop. So, I kept at it but just could not get Ndiswrapper to work. So, I tried just Ubuntu and quickly ran away from that system as fast as I installed it! lol... I thought about and made a install disk for Mint 12 as I had reports from others that Ndiswrapper was working great on that version. I ended up not installing Mint 12...

Long story short... Too Late! I ended up just installing Mint 15 and Viola!!! It recognized my wireless card perfectly! So, to all that want to work with Linux or anyone who wants a developers type workstation, then this IS the way to go. Thank you Terry for being the one that turned me on to it!
~Jer
I reread this thread.
Not sure I had read this post.
Most driver problems on Distros built on Ubuntu, or debian. (Mint is built on Ubuntu)
Can be fixed with these two command line commands.
First open Terminal
Then run this.
$ sudo apt-get update
After that runs then do this one.
$ sudo apt-get install linux-firmware-nonfree
This fixes most wifi issues with old wifi cards that require proprietary drivers.
Sorry if you want a GUI way of doing this. I don't know of one.
This way is easiest.
T
 
DrGonz78 12/22/2014 3:31 PM
Yeah as I recall the laptop was an old Toshiba, but new enough to still be useful. I am pretty sure while troubleshooting that I did those same command line commands too. When I finally installed Mint15 on that machine the wireless still did not work at first. Then it started working and never stopped since. I actually enjoy working in the command line world but at first I have to brush off the rust.
 
big_teee 12/22/2014 5:10 PM
My wife had a Compaq Presario, IDE Laptop.
Ubuntu type linux was the only Linux that would run the wifi.
Only then, after running the firmware patch.
Luckily the newer laptop wifi's got over that issue.
Sometimes nothing works, I've had my share of that too.
T
 
km6xz 12/23/2014 7:08 AM
From my own experience, what amazed me is how many bizarre hardware configs ran upon first install of Ubuntu or Mint going back to 8.04 Ubuntu, my first real install. Scanners, printers, wireless cards, ,USB modems, tablets, cameras, sound cards, network cards all worked. Sure has been easier than installing drivers in Windows.
 
Steve A. 12/23/2014 3:26 PM
Quote Originally Posted by km6xz View Post
From my own experience, what amazed me is how many bizarre hardware configs ran upon first install of Ubuntu or Mint going back to 8.04 Ubuntu, my first real install. Scanners, printers, wireless cards, ,USB modems, tablets, cameras, sound cards, network cards all worked. Sure has been easier than installing drivers in Windows.
As much as I dislike Windows 7 and 8.1 I have to admit that they are pretty good at finding and installing drivers- much better than the earlier incarnations. Glad to hear that the Linux world has the driver issue in hand (I think it used to be one of the early drawbacks going back ~10 years.)

Steve
 
big_teee 4/24/2015 9:25 AM
Ubuntu announced a new Desktop, Mate.
Mate was previously found on Mint.
Because of Mates popularity in Mint, I guess Ubuntu wanted to use it too.
Check it out.
Distribution Release: Ubuntu MATE 15.04 (DistroWatch.com News)
 
bluto 4/28/2015 12:38 AM
Thanks, good to know, will test drive it via Virtualbox.
BTW, there are a couple of good podcasts that cover, Linux, Mint , Ubuntu etc. that will no doubt do comprehensive reviews on 15.04 and Mate.
mintCast | The podcast by the Linux Mint community for all users of Linux
Linux Luddites | Not all change is progress



Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
Ubuntu announced a new Desktop, Mate.
Mate was previously found on Mint.
Because of Mates popularity in Mint, I guess Ubuntu wanted to use it too.
Check it out.
Distribution Release: Ubuntu MATE 15.04 (DistroWatch.com News)
 
km6xz 4/28/2015 4:10 AM
That is interesting, I am downloading now. I don't keep up with changes, just use Ubuntu on the office computers and it just works, all the time. Getting two new computers today(new to me, surplus from a government owned business that is required to update computers on a 2 year cycle) and will try it.
I only hear about new versions when one version I am using goes EOL or Big_Tee announces it on this thread;>) I'll let him test drive the distros.....I have gotten a whole office to be happy with Unity so not sure if I should stir up the bee hive. I don't even mind Unity, so used to it and it does have a simple uncluttered interface.
 
big_teee 4/28/2015 3:20 PM
Quote Originally Posted by km6xz View Post
That is interesting, I am downloading now. I don't keep up with changes, just use Ubuntu on the office computers and it just works, all the time. Getting two new computers today(new to me, surplus from a government owned business that is required to update computers on a 2 year cycle) and will try it.
I only hear about new versions when one version I am using goes EOL or Big_Tee announces it on this thread;>) I'll let him test drive the distros.....I have gotten a whole office to be happy with Unity so not sure if I should stir up the bee hive. I don't even mind Unity, so used to it and it does have a simple uncluttered interface.
My absolute Favorite Distro is Mint XFCE.
It is so simple and so user friendly.
You might want to give it a yank!
I get it here.
LinuxMint.de - Aktuellste und archivierte Versionen der bekannten Linux Distribution
T
 
Paleo Pete 5/11/2015 7:38 AM
Haven't looked at this thread in a while...The only time I use Ubuntu was an older version from about 5 or 6 years ago, pretty good but a bit sluggish on the machine I was using, one of my mix and match machines from used parts. The only driver issue I ever had was with nVidia video cards, I had to manually install their driver.

Right now I'm looking into installing Puppy on a USB drive, just got a 64GB USB drive and considering setting it up with about a 4 or 8GB partition for Linux, the rest for Windows accessible storage. I've already tried it on CD, works well.
 
big_teee 5/11/2015 9:19 AM
I tried Puppy and I couldn't get it to run with newer Laptop computers with efi, and secure boot bios.
Have better luck on new machines with all the mints, Ubuntu's, Fedora, OpenSuse, Porteus, Mageia, Open Mandriva, and a few more.
I ran Mint Mate on a 16gb USB drive for a couple of years.
Worked great, but I do like a dedicated hard drive better.
GL, with the Puppy on the 64GB.
T
 
big_teee 6/14/2015 10:41 AM
Hi:
I downloaded Voyager X8 Linux with efi support.
I ran it in live in Virtual Machine, on my mint OS.
It has a fresh look and uses the XFCE desktop, which is the desktop I normally use.
It is running a version of debian, which is the parent OS of Ubuntu, and mint.
It really ran good, and I think I want to try it live loaded on a USB stick next.
If you want to give it a try you can get it here.
Distribution Release: Voyager Live X8 (DistroWatch.com News)
 
big_teee 6/17/2015 11:56 AM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
Hi:
I downloaded Voyager X8 Linux with efi support.
I ran it in live in Virtual Machine, on my mint OS.
It has a fresh look and uses the XFCE desktop, which is the desktop I normally use.
It is running a version of debian, which is the parent OS of Ubuntu, and mint.
It really ran good, and I think I want to try it live loaded on a USB stick next.
If you want to give it a try you can get it here.
Distribution Release: Voyager Live X8 (DistroWatch.com News)
.
I loaded it on a USB Stick, and it ran great, so I loaded it on My Toshiba that has a GPT Hard drive setup with 6 bootable linux partitions.
X8 is a very fast and fully packed system with lots of features, including pre installed AV, and Libre Office Suite.
It is using XFCE with 3 start button panels, that all use auto hide.
So the main panel 1, is at the top, the panel 2 is at the bottom, full of applications, and there is a panel 3 on the right side that has utilities.
When you open IceWeasel(Debians version of Firefox), the three panels auto hide leaving the whole screen for the browser.
Run your cursor up, down and to the right, and the panels appear.
A very slick system, but takes a bit of getting used to all the apps, and difference appearance.
So far, I would rate it a good solid B+.
T
 
big_teee 6/30/2015 11:36 AM
Want your ubuntu to run faster?
You may want to try and load a Low Latency kernel.
This applies to all the Ubuntu, and Mint Distros.
Kernels come in different types.
Regular generic kernels
Low Latency kernels
RT Kernels (half way between Low Latency and Real time)
Real Time Kernels (Used by the Government)
Ubuntu keeps the regular generic, and the Low latency kernels available on the repositories.
** DISCLAIMER, LOAD NEW KERNELS AT YOUR OWN RISK!!!
This is for Intermediate to advanced Linux Users.
To see what kernel your machine is running on, do this command from command line.
terry-Lenovo-IdeaPad-N586 terry # uname -r
3.19.0-21-lowlatency
terry-Lenovo-IdeaPad-N586 terry # uname -m
x86_64
The above commands shows I'm running kernel 3.19.0-21-lowlatency, and my processor is a x86_64.
If I was on the regular kernel, I could install the low latentcy kernel with this command.

terry-Lenovo-IdeaPad-N586 terry # apt-get install linux-image-3.19.0-21-lowlatency
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree
Reading state information... Done
linux-image-3.19.0-21-lowlatency is already the newest version.
0 upgraded, 0 newly installed, 0 to remove and 0 not upgraded.

It was already installed, so it didn't do it again.
If it wasn't already installed, it would have done so.
The Low latency kernel is faster for streaming, web surfing, gaming, etc.
T
 
northanaya 7/4/2015 10:25 AM
yes Ubuntu is free to use licence so anybody can use it as compared to window , i used Ubuntu 3 years ago
 
big_teee 10/19/2015 6:00 PM
All computers hard drive seem to grow, and get clogged up with backup files, etc.
Linux is not as bad as some other OS's do, but they still grow some.
Here is a neat cleanup utility to offset that.
Clean Your System and Free Disk Space | BleachBit
Easily installed with command line.
# apt-get install bleachbit
T
 
big_teee 10/22/2015 8:02 AM
Hey, All You Linux Lovers out there!
Ubuntu 15.10 Official is released today(10-22-15).
It's offcial Title is 15.10 Wily Werewolf.
Ubuntu has two new distos per year, the issue #15.10 is based on year and month.
The next issue next year will be 16.04.
All flavors of Ubuntu should be released today.
You can find them all here.
Index of /
One of my favorites is Ubuntu Studio, and it comes loaded with lots of Audio, and studio software, with the XFCE desktop.
Ubuntu-Unity
Ubuntu-Gnome
Ubuntu-Mate
Kubuntu-KDE
Lubuntu-LXDE
Ubuntu-Studio- XFCE
Xubuntu-XFCE
Ubuntukylin-Official Chinese Version
 
big_teee 11/25/2015 7:58 AM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
Hey, All You Linux Lovers out there!
Ubuntu 15.10 Official is released today(10-22-15).
It's offcial Title is 15.10 Wily Werewolf.
Ubuntu has two new distos per year, the issue #15.10 is based on year and month.
The next issue next year will be 16.04.
All flavors of Ubuntu should be released today.
You can find them all here.
Index of /
One of my favorites is Ubuntu Studio, and it comes loaded with lots of Audio, and studio software, with the XFCE desktop.
Ubuntu-Unity
Ubuntu-Gnome
Ubuntu-Mate
Kubuntu-KDE
Lubuntu-LXDE
Ubuntu-Studio- XFCE
Xubuntu-XFCE
Ubuntukylin-Official Chinese Version
I've recently switched my computers, from Mint, to the 15.10 Xubuntu version of Ubuntu.
It has the new 4.2.0-18 kernel, the new Libreoffice 5 office suite.
This version flies on my two everyday laptops.
Distribution Release: Xubuntu 15.10 (DistroWatch.com News)
Give it a whirl!
T
T
 
big_teee 1/4/2016 4:30 PM
I have two multi-boot laptops.
One has 5 linux Distros, and the other 4 distros, no Windoz.
This allows me to run, and test different linux OS systems.
I primarily run Debian Derivatives.
Which include Ubuntu and mint.
apt-get package manager commands work on all Debian type loads.
A new one I've tried which is a stable Debian distro called, AntiX MX-15.
It is based on Debian Jessie 8.
It has the newer 4.2 kernel, with the XFCE desktop.
I like it, it's very fast, more stripped down, and not as bloated as Mint, & Ubuntu.
It is a little harder to install, and I recommend it for intermediate, and advanced linux users.
Because the installer is a bit more involved to install the OS.
DistroWatch.com: antiX
I like the AntiX MX-15 Very Much!
Check it out.
T
 
big_teee 4/24/2016 10:55 AM
UBUNTU 16.04 LTS Released
Ubuntu releases its 16.04LTS (long term support) family of desktop operating systems.
They are:
Ubuntu-Unity
Ubuntu-KDE
Ubuntu-Gnome
Ubuntu-Mate
Ubuntu-XFCE
Ubuntu-Studio
Ubuntu-LXDE
Ubuntu-Education
Ubuntu-Server
Ubuntu-Kylin (Chinese Release)
Ubuntu-Mythbuntu
There is a ubuntu for nearly everyone.
16.04LTS will be supported for 5 years, and it is FREE!
The leading OS for PC, tablet, phone and cloud | Ubuntu
I run a hybrid Load, which I really like.
I load Ubuntu Mate, then I add the XFCE Desktop.
That makes it where you can log in with the Mate desktop, or with the XFCE desktop.
By doing that, I get my XFCE desktop I like so much, with all the bells and whistles of the Mate OS Distro.
T
 
km6xz 4/24/2016 11:15 AM
Yes, these LTS versions are the best solution for business application because they have full support for such a long time. Businesses don't like to experiment with minor changes in OS or front end. Most home Linux users try new versions as soon as they are available. They are so easy to download and install hobbyists and home users load lots of versions. Compared to the old days there are enough standards in hardware interfaces that all of the versions work with a wide variety of hardware vintages. Although you can run multiple OS if you have the memory you can use VMware that creates virtual machines running under Linux so you can load in different OS running at the same time. Really slick. That way you could be running a native secure Linux for your web surfing and Windows in virtual machines so you can copy data from one to another OS. yet keep the less secure Windows OS invisible to the web, but still use data collected and pasted from it into the Windows running in a Virtual Machine.
 
big_teee 4/24/2016 11:41 AM
I tried the VM, and I prefer just linux in multi-boot scenario.
I always have at least 2 bootable linux distros in grub.
If you have a problem with one distro, just boot to the other to make your repairs. EZ-PZ.
I've had as many as 7 bootable distros, but it is time consuming to keep them all updated.
Now I either load 2 or 3.
No Windoz here, I'll leave that to the rest of the group.
Here's a screenshot of my 16.04 Mate/XFCE Load.
The small toolbar on the left is set to auto hide.
I have it visible for the picture.
T
 
Steve A. 4/25/2016 8:25 AM
With this very active thread being almost 3 1/2 years I decided to make it a sticky to go along with the new stickies for other OS's... although it has never been far from the top of the thread list.

I still have not made the plunge into Linux myself... yes, I am chicken!

Steve Ahola
 
big_teee 4/25/2016 8:44 AM
Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
With this very active thread being almost 3 1/2 years I decided to make it a sticky to go along with the new stickies for other OS's... although it has never been far from the top of the thread list.

I still have not made the plunge into Linux myself... yes, I am chicken!

Steve Ahola
[ATTACH=CONFIG]38811[/ATTACH]


Chic, Chic, Chic, Chic, Chicken!
 
Steve A. 4/26/2016 7:33 AM
This looks like a promising way to dip your feet in Linux. Here are two listings from one seller in MD who refurbishes off-lease computers which come with Linux Mint installed. The first one (small frame factor) sells for $45 w/ free shipping, the other one (a more powerful horizontal desktop unit) sells for the same price but has a $24.21 shipping charge.

The seller has had almost 15k sales with 99.8% positive feedback. I have no vested interested in these listing but am thinking of buying one (or both to get 6 months same as cash from PayPal Credit for purchases over $99.)

BTW there are many reputable sellers of refurbished off-lease computers which I have found to be a better deal than buying new, assuming you don't mind buying older models (the Lenovo M58 series was first sold in 2009.)

Lenovo ThinkCentre M58p SFF PC C2D E8400 3GHz 2GB 80GB Linux Mint - DVDRW (10+ units available) $45 w/ free shipping

“Off lease unit. Original hard drive was destroyed. We've installed a 80GB with Linux Mint on it.”
[IMG]http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/ak4AAOSwymxVK~QT/s-l400.jpg[/IMG]


[IMG]http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/zTsAAOSwcwhVK~QW/s-l400.jpg[/IMG]


Lenovo ThinkCentre M58p SFF PC C2D E8400 3GHz 2GB 80GB Linux Mint DVDRW | eBay

%=%=%=%=%=%=%=%

Lenovo ThinkCentre M58p Core 2 Duo E8400 3.00GHz 4GB RAM 160GB HDD Linux Mint (7 units available) $44.99 + $24.21 s/h

“PCs are in great condition. Some may show minor scratching from previous use. One PC has a broken retaining clip on the PCIe slot. Original hard drives were destroyed and replaced with 160GB HDDs with Linux Mint pre-installed. Sale is for PC only. Tested for full functions, R2/Ready for reuse.”

[IMG]http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/Ra4AAOSwstxVW4Jn/s-l1600.jpg[/IMG]


[IMG]http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/6g8AAOSwBLlVW4Ju/s-l1600.jpg[/IMG]


Lenovo ThinkCentre M58p Core 2 Duo E8400 3 00GHz 4GB RAM 160GB HDD Linux Mint | eBay


Steve Ahola

P.S. Seller has many other refurbished off-lease computers for sale. I listed this one because of the reviews. The desktop version has a lot more expansion options and 4GB RAM. I believe that for either version you could replace the optical drive with a hard drive and when actually needed use an external USB drive. They both come with eSATA ports but in the SFF version the port is internal with no means of egress unless you want to drill and/or nibble a hole.

Lenovo ThinkCentre M58p Eco Ultra Small Review & Rating | PCMag.com
 
Steve A. 4/26/2016 7:38 AM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
[ATTACH=CONFIG]38811[/ATTACH]


Chic, Chic, Chic, Chic, Chicken!
Funny that I hadn't read your reply when I composed Post #111 suggesting the refurbished off-lease computers with Linux Mint pre-installed. Ah, buck buck!

BTW it was installing Linux on a working Windows box that scared me, not learning a new OS.

Steve
 
big_teee 4/26/2016 8:03 AM
The Refurbs sound like a great idea.
Linux is a little intimidating at first.
Steve, I bet you would have no problems.

I've been on Linux so long now, Windows sounds intimidating.
It's all what you get used to.
Sorry about the chicken, I couldn't resist!
T
 
big_teee 5/4/2016 1:09 AM
Ubuntu 16.04 Long Term Release, seems to be about the most stable version yet.
I like it!
You can access any of the Ubuntu family here.
Index of /
T
 
big_teee 7/23/2016 9:50 AM
The first maintenance release of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is out.
It is 16.04.01, with new drivers, and all the updates, preinstalled.
Distribution Release: Ubuntu 16.04.1 (DistroWatch.com News)
I used to run Mint, which is repackaged Ubuntu.
Now I only run Ubuntu.
IMO Mint got too big, and too Bloated.
I either run Xubuntu, or Ubuntu Mate, with the XFCE4 desktop installed.
It is very stable and very fast.
And, again I'll tell you, It's Free!
What's not to like?
YMMV,
T
 
km6xz 7/23/2016 10:42 AM
I noticed the same thing with Mint. It is a slick polished package but has grown so it needs more resources. I need to set up another simple reliable office machine and the only stumbling block is no good multifunction printer/scanner drivers for my Panasonic printer/copier/scanner. Printer drivers are fine but not for integrating the scan functions which I need. All other hardware, on all my installs have been painless and automatic on Ubuntu. Heck I even like the Unity interface. It still surprises me every time a new version or new computer it tossed together with sometimes obscure hardware, the install finds drivers for everything. Windows 10 was pretty good for that finally, about 8 years behind Ubuntu.
 
big_teee 7/23/2016 10:49 AM
I use the Ubuntu basic document scanner all the time.
As far as printer drivers, I use the resident drivers, and I use the printer and scanner wifi.
See Picture.
 
big_teee 1/4/2017 10:46 AM
Ubuntu, keeps upgrading, and is keeping up with hardware, and programs.
I run Ubuntu Mate. This one.
http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=09589
It's easy to load, runs fast, it's FREE, plus, I always forget to mention, it's Linux, & it's fun!
Check it out!
T
 
big_teee 1/16/2017 10:50 AM
When a new ubuntu distro is added to a computer, you start with a welcome page.
On the welcome page is a feature tab.
I usually just delete the welcome page and keep going.
This time I read the feature tab, and read this screenshot.
Found it interesting, and you might as well, it is about linux security.
 
big_teee 4/13/2017 7:31 AM
Ubuntu 17.04 desktop came out today.
17.04 is year and month of issue.
Here are a few screenshots of my new load I installed this morning.
Still getting all my personal prefs set.
So far Ubuntu 17.04 seems to be rock solid!
Ubuntu is Free.
It being free, allows me to run the newest, latest software, with all available security updates, at no expense.
Give it a try!
Index of /

T
 
Enzo 4/13/2017 8:45 AM
I know absolutely zero about this. I see the screen saver picture, the other screens don't mean anything to me. This takes the place of ...Windows?

If I were to put it on my computer, would my Adobe just up and run when I launch it? Will my TurboTax just up and run? CHrome? or would I have to go through a bunch of tweaking and setting interrupts or whatever?

I mostly open pdf or GIF/JIF, picture files. Occasionally I get something that opens in an IE page, would that work? I guess my basic question is this: If I buy a computer with Windows and IE, I can turn it on and everything works. If I installed your program, what - if anything - would change in that formula?
 
big_teee 4/13/2017 9:28 AM
If you have to have windows programs, you probably need to stay on windows.
Linux is an alternative to Windows, and uses its own programs.
I use a linux pdf viewer similar to adobe, but not adobe.
Depending on what your computer learning curve is?
If you want to try a live version of linux?
You can run it from a DVD, or from a memory stick, loaded with ubuntu.
This wouldn't effect your current windows load.
Just turn off and reboot into windows.
Linux isn't for everyone, but I like it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wpALe245EOQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DrJgeuloNVU
https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...buntu+live+usb
T
 
Enzo 4/13/2017 10:06 AM
Thanks, it probably isn't for me either, but I am trying to understand it. My curve is very slow.

If there was an alternate pdf fiewer that worked the same as Adobe, great, good enough. I know the default pdf viewer in Chrome sucks terribly.

So for example, I could not run Turbo Tax on it? Does Pro Tools support it?
 
big_teee 4/13/2017 11:08 AM
I don't know anything about turbo tax.
My wife keeps up with the tax stuff all year, and we pay the lady down the street to do our taxes.
I take the money I save on windows software and pay her!
She's cheap.
I thought you could just do the taxes with turbo, or others online?
If you were nearby, I would give you a demo, picture worth a thousand words.
I have been windows free, for nearly 5 years now.
Wouldn't know how to start using it again, or want to.
I take that back, I've run 8.1, and win 10, just long enough to get it off the hard drive.
What I remember most about it, is how slow it runs.
GL,
T
 
big_teee 4/13/2017 12:29 PM
Here's a link to distrowatch.
DistroWatch.com: Put the fun back into computing. Use Linux, BSD.
It keeps up with all the current linux, goings on!
It's the Open Source Hang out!
T
 
DrGonz78 4/13/2017 2:04 PM
Yup the PDF viewer in my Linux Mint 17 is great!! For me I use Linux to surf the web and forget about being bogged down by windows issues. I turn on the machine, type password, and then 20-30 seconds later desktop shows up (already connected to Internet), fast!! I never have any REAL issues any more since switching to Linux for 2 Years now. I think the best idea is to have your safe secure Windows install on a computer that you do taxes on and that kind of stuff. Actually I have a computer that is Windows for business stuff then I have another one that runs barely any processes as audio workstation that does not connect to the Internet. Audacity works rather well on Linux and I have processed video more successfully than on my other windows box. Most major business software is not being written for Linux/Ubuntu.

I guess my main point here is that the Linux versions are getting really good results just straight out of the box. Actually I had more problems with windows than Linux with right out of the box installs.
 
Enzo 4/13/2017 10:19 PM
Well I was using TurboTax more as a metaphore for all the regular commercial software I have. Apparently I need to get software specifically designed for Ubuntu then.

As to tax specifically, yes, you can geet basic short form taxes done free in many placces, but I have to file schedule C and other business forms, which are not included in those. I used to file a partnership return, schedule K and all that, and I did it on paper. Software is SOOOO much better. It wasn't "hard" by hand, it is just a lot of shuffling. The software knows what all you have to file, so I don't have one of those "Oh crap, I need a 2106" moments.

I never understood the griping about Windows or some browsers. To me, they all open up and get me my email, process my words, and get me here. And then...Windows 10 happened. Boy was it a mistake to let that download itself.
 
Tom Phillips 4/13/2017 10:45 PM
So I take it that you cannot run Microsoft office programs or Microsoft Project on Linux. Is that correct? I'm not asking because they are great programs but because some of us need to be compatible with the mainstream business software in order to collaborate with others. I know about open office. It works well on it's own and is mostly compatible. However, it you try to work in a situation that switches back and forth between open office and Microsoft office then the file gets scrambled and the result does not produce a clean final product.

What about running programs such as Duncan's amp tools under Linux? And I too need to run programs such as turbotax, Adobe Photoshop Elements, video editors etc. Do such programs run under Linux?
 
big_teee 4/13/2017 10:47 PM
Linux is more of a self contained world.
When you load Ubuntu, you get a office suite called libreoffice.
You usually get firefox or chromium browsers.
It comes preloaded with lots of tools, Viewers, players, & accessories, etc.
Most everything else you may want to download, is on Ubuntu Repositories.
The Repositories are Ubuntu's server, or cloud, and can be accessed by a gui (graphical user Interface).
Or if you know what program you need, you can do it by command line.
I usually install programs by command line, it is quicker.
Below is a pic of both.
Everything I use is accessible somewhere for free.
I pretty much have a linux way of doing anything I wanted to do with windows.

T
 
big_teee 4/13/2017 10:59 PM
I do linux only.
Some guys do dual boot, both linux and windows on the same Hard drive.
Some do Virtual Machine, for either linux or windows.
My wifes laptop, it came with windows 10.
I left 10 on it, and cleared space for ubuntu, and it is now dual boot.
Though it has windows capability, we never boot it up to windows.
Another option that I used to do when I was a travel comm tech?
I carried a linux OS on a thumbdrive, or Memory stick.
I would boot into windows, for work and linux thumbdrive for personal email and such.
My answer to everything now that I'm retired, is to buy another cheap laptop.
We have 4 laptops.
All in the $200-400 range.
Put linux on a laptop, and do your nightime surfing on that.
On my laptops, I do dual boot linux.
I keep one linux just for my stock and banking stuff.
Then I boot to another linux when I am all over the web doing everything else.
T
 
DrGonz78 4/14/2017 12:34 AM
Quote Originally Posted by Tom Phillips View Post
What about running programs such as Duncan's amp tools under Linux? And I too need to run programs such as turbotax, Adobe Photoshop Elements, video editors etc. Do such programs run under Linux?
I can and do run Photoshop, Tone Stack Calc, Express PCB, Express Sch, PSU Designer, and LTSpice IV under WINE. Not sure about Duncan's amp tools but heck I would try it out. Lots of windows stuff runs just fine with WINE installed. I would try out Turbo Tax but I choose to separate my computers from business and pleasure. I now prefer Gimp to Photoshop and really believe in the programs for Linux.

Another point. When I have a 192k 32bit wave audio file and I try to play it on a basic install of windows it just errors out. To make that work I need a sound card and software to allow windows to play such files of that format. In my Linux Mint install, right out of the box, it plays them all with some sort of built in codec or something. I was amazed the first time!!
 
Tom Phillips 4/14/2017 7:48 AM
Quote Originally Posted by DrGonz78 View Post
I can and do run Photoshop, Tone Stack Calc, Express PCB, Express Sch, PSU Designer, and LTSpice IV under WINE. Not sure about Duncan's amp tools but heck I would try it out. Lots of windows stuff runs just fine with WINE installed. I would try out Turbo Tax but I choose to separate my computers from business and pleasure. I now prefer Gimp to Photoshop and really believe in the programs for Linux.
Another point. When I have a 192k 32bit wave audio file and I try to play it on a basic install of windows it just errors out. To make that work I need a sound card and software to allow windows to play such files of that format. In my Linux Mint install, right out of the box, it plays them all with some sort of built in codec or something. I was amazed the first time!!
That's pretty good compatibility. I'll keep learning about Linux possibilities. I've got the hardware to experiment on but I also have a large backlog on my general "To do" list.
Thanks for the detailed info.
 
Bloomfield 4/14/2017 8:37 AM
This is interesting. I had Ubuntu a few years ago on a laptop that was set up by a friend of mine down the street who is a genius programmer. I found it worked really well although I didn't do much beyond using the web. Never had any trouble with viruses or anything like that. One thing that can be a problem is hardware compatibility; in the time I had it I got a new printer and a USB turntable. Both came with drivers for Mac and Windows only. My friend was able to have them working within a few minutes after I had struggled for a couple of hours. Later he moved to New York and it soon became evident that I didn't have the skills to carry on with it myself, so I switched to this old Macbook. I think Ubuntu is a good system, in fact I preferred many aspects of it. The fact that you can install it on cheap PC's is a big bonus. It seems to me though that it's more of an enthusiast thing that you need to have the skills and interest to invest in it. Much like tube amps or old cars or whatever else. I would certainly try it again in the future; I might need some help though.

Andy
 
Enzo 4/14/2017 9:37 AM
That describes my fears: it probably works just fine, but it requires a certain level of computer savvy to live with. Some people enjoy dealing with it, I just want the computer to be a box that does what I want without me telling it anything. I am lost as soon as someone says, "Oh, all you have to do is reboot your DLL file etc etc..."


On the other hand, when people ask about buying an oscilloscope or something, I usually tell them that only experience can tell you what you really want in one. SO start with most any scope, and use it to find out what scopes do, THEN worry about the nuances. I guess the thing to do woul;d be load it onto a computer and mess with it.
 
Dave H 4/14/2017 4:27 PM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
Ubuntu, keeps upgrading, and is keeping up with hardware, and programs.
I run Ubuntu Mate. This one.
Distribution Release: Ubuntu MATE 16.10 (DistroWatch.com News)
It's easy to load, runs fast, it's FREE, plus, I always forget to mention, it's Linux, & it's fun!
Check it out!
T
The trouble I have with Linux is that there's too much choice. In that link there are 100 distributions down the right side and a stack more down the left side so how can anyone know which to chose?
 
big_teee 4/14/2017 4:57 PM
If you are new to linux?
I would stick with Mint or Ubuntu.
They are by far the easiest to use, and load.
Mint is probably the best choice to start with for Linux Newbies.
I used Mint for a couple of years.
I now prefer the different flavors of Ubuntu.
There are several flavors of Ubuntu, and the difference is the desktop used.
Mint and Ubuntu have the best installer, and best hardware support.
There are many youtube vids on loading ubuntu, or mint.
Give it a try!
T
 
Dave H 4/15/2017 8:02 AM
Thanks, I'll do that. I tried Ubunto years ago when it was small enough to fit on a CD. I'll put it on a flash drive this time. Now I just have to remember how to access the BIOS to change the boot order.
 
big_teee 4/15/2017 8:16 AM
F2, at boot up, works on most computers.
Or try F12 at power up with usb drive plugged in, then choose boot from usb.
However they all have their own tricks.
This mint XFCE is a good choice if you like a XP, or Win98 looking desktop?
http://www.linuxmint.de/get/dc071404...492269245/1338
GL,
T
 
Mark Lavelle 4/15/2017 9:13 AM
If your PC hase 8GB, you should install VirtualBox and run Ubuntu inside that. Then you don't have to deal with the hassle of re-booting to switch. It's also easy to set up shared directories that both Windows and the VirtualBox can see.
 
big_teee 4/15/2017 9:23 AM
The only problem I see with running Ubuntu VB, is you're still stuck with slow Windoz as your main OS.
Maybe loading Ubuntu as main OS, and running Win XP, or Win7 as Virtual Machine would be a viable option.
I'll stick to multi-boot Linux only. YMMV
Below is my Hard drive, that shows 4 bootable linux Distros.
T
 
big_teee 4/15/2017 11:27 AM
I have just experimented with Virtualbox, and it works pretty slick.
Booted into Ubuntu, I installed Virtualbox, then installed Mint 18.1 into the VB.
Below is a screenshot of it.
The big screen is Ubuntu, the window in the middle is the Virtualbox with Mint 18.1 loaded in it.
You can do the same thing as mentioned, put VB linux on windows, or put VB windows on linux.

T
 
Mark Lavelle 4/15/2017 5:46 PM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
The only problem I see with running Ubuntu VB, is you're still stuck with slow Windoz as your main OS.
I have a 3.4GHz Core i7 and 24GB of RAM, and you should too! ;-)

Seriously, any Win 10 machine with 4GB of RAM runs pretty well, IME. A low end Win10 laptop might be a less-than-exciting virtual machine host, but it works. And since you can't get much serious music production SW for Linux I'll be sticking with real Win10 & virtual Linux for the forseeable future.
 
big_teee 4/15/2017 6:00 PM
Since music is what you do that is great. I doubt there are many here with 24gb ram.
I have 12 gb on this lenovo, lap.
I have 3 fairly new laptops, and I couldn't get windoz off fast enough.
Linux does everything I need.
Also a reminder, this is a linux thread, not a Bill Gates thread!
GL,
T
 
Mark Lavelle 4/16/2017 10:08 AM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
Also a reminder, this is a linux thread, not a Bill Gates thread!
Sorry about the distraction, but I do use Linux all the time - I just prefer doing it in a VM.

Changing the subject: Why do you use more than one distro? Is there something important that Ubuntu can't do?
 
big_teee 4/16/2017 11:00 AM
You're fine,
I'm retired, and I'm a distro hopper.
I've probably tried 30 different distros in recent years.
I used Mint for a while, cause I absolutely hate the Ubuntu Unity backwards desktop.
Now I load XFCE4 desktop on whatever linux platform I use.
On my Laptops, Ubuntu Mate is the best running platform I've found, but I load the XFCE4 desktop on them.

The reason IMO for the interest here with linux, is so many would love to leave their Win 8.1, or win 10 behind.
If you run linux VM, then you are stuck with all the Win software, AV, Spyware, Office dilemmas so many want to leave behind.
With VB VM, I spend too much switching, and donking with the computer, instead of using it.
Also file sharing has to be setup, to look between the OS, and the VB.
Which is all fine, just not for me.

I like to run multi-boot, cause it just gives more options.
I have Partition 2 setup with 16.10, I use it for stock, banking and other secure stuff, I leave this one alone mostly.
I use the other distros for everything else. I'm always busy adding different distros, and changing kernels.
That's what I like to do, and I like beating on Linux!
Oh Yea, It's free, and IMO it's fun!

I usually report here, everytime Ubuntu has an upgrade like the new release of 17.04
http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/
T
 
DrGonz78 4/16/2017 1:40 PM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
I used Mint for a while, cause I absolutely hate the Ubuntu Unity backwards desktop.
Seems to me that you were not alone there T. LOL
Why Ubuntu dumping Unity is a good thing | PCWorld
 
big_teee 4/18/2017 9:24 AM
Got all four laptops in the house updated from Ubuntu 16.10 to 17.04.
So far it seems to be great desktop software.
T
 
big_teee 9/3/2017 11:26 AM
Ubuntu 17.10 Beta 1 is now out, and available for download.
Beta 1 is a prelude to the Official version, that will be out in October.
Development Release: Kubuntu 17.10 Beta 1 (DistroWatch.com News)
It comes in many desktop flavors, and runs on the latest 4.12 Kernel. (the kernel, contains the latest hardware drivers)
I downloaded the 17.10 beta 1 Mate version.
Here's my desktop screenshot.
A very fast linux OS.
Give it a shot. It's FREEE.
T
**Edit
The screenshot is with a customized XFCE desktop, installed.
 
Gnobuddy 9/3/2017 12:27 PM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
I downloaded the 17.10 beta 1 Mate version.
At home, I've been Linux-only since 2001. Sixteen years now. Currently using Xubuntu, which I was driven to because both KDE and Gnome became unusable as far as I was concerned.

I've never tried Mate, will have to test it out some day. Meantime, XFCE / Xubuntu does the job for me.

I have to use Windows at work, and, most of the time, it feels like taking a couple of steps backwards. Worst of all is the constant worry - will I get a worm? A virus? Ransomware?

-Gnobuddy
 
DrGonz78 9/3/2017 1:07 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Gnobuddy View Post
At home, I've been Linux-only since 2001. Sixteen years now. Currently using Xubuntu, which I was driven to because both KDE and Gnome became unusable as far as I was concerned.

I've never tried Mate, will have to test it out some day. Meantime, XFCE / Xubuntu does the job for me.
I personally think that there could be a downward trend with the lighter weight legacy driver type available varieties of ubuntu or in my case linux mint XFCE. My point being that I have a computer in my work shop that has pretty dated hardware, 2003-2004, which was running Linux Mint XFCE without a hitch for about 2 years. Then there was this software update, about 3 months ago, that rendered the computer almost completely useless. So all of a sudden it cannot run software manager from GUI or command line and no internet etc... I installed it again and from the image file the installation works flawless. Then update some stuff and it all fooked up again. I installed 4 other versions of XFCE as well as others and it was as if the new updates did not like my hardware. I mean I ran a full memory test on RAM with no issues. I swapped out for 3 different hard drives with no change. I currently have Mint 17.1 XFCE installed on that computer and it works great if you just don't run the newest kernel update.

EDIT: Note that all the flavors of XFCE I tried were all tied in to Ubuntu kernels.
 
Gnobuddy 9/3/2017 2:03 PM
Quote Originally Posted by DrGonz78 View Post
Then update some stuff and it all fooked up again.
And a very frustrating experience it is, when an update bjorks your system.

I have had that happen at least once with with every operating system I've used on a PC - Windows, OSX, Linux, and FreeBSD. Nothing is perfect, such is life!

-Gnobuddy
 
big_teee 9/3/2017 3:40 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Gnobuddy View Post
At home, I've been Linux-only since 2001. Sixteen years now. Currently using Xubuntu, which I was driven to because both KDE and Gnome became unusable as far as I was concerned.

I've never tried Mate, will have to test it out some day. Meantime, XFCE / Xubuntu does the job for me.

I have to use Windows at work, and, most of the time, it feels like taking a couple of steps backwards. Worst of all is the constant worry - will I get a worm? A virus? Ransomware?

-Gnobuddy
Actually my flavor of linux, is Mate/XFCE.
I install U-Mate, then I install XFCE4, XFCE4-Goodies, and XFWM4-themes, from the repositories.
That gives the option of running either of two desktops, mate, or XFCE.
U-mate has a great base, but I too, prefer the XFCE desktop.
My laptops like the Mate/X, better than the Xubuntu alone.
I've been Linux only for 5 years now.
Ran it off and on since about 1999.
T
 
big_teee 9/3/2017 4:03 PM
Quote Originally Posted by DrGonz78 View Post
I personally think that there could be a downward trend with the lighter weight legacy driver type available varieties of ubuntu or in my case linux mint XFCE. My point being that I have a computer in my work shop that has pretty dated hardware, 2003-2004, which was running Linux Mint XFCE without a hitch for about 2 years. Then there was this software update, about 3 months ago, that rendered the computer almost completely useless. So all of a sudden it cannot run software manager from GUI or command line and no internet etc... I installed it again and from the image file the installation works flawless. Then update some stuff and it all fooked up again. I installed 4 other versions of XFCE as well as others and it was as if the new updates did not like my hardware. I mean I ran a full memory test on RAM with no issues. I swapped out for 3 different hard drives with no change. I currently have Mint 17.1 XFCE installed on that computer and it works great if you just don't run the newest kernel update.

EDIT: Note that all the flavors of XFCE I tried were all tied in to Ubuntu kernels.
Hi DrGonz:
It is probably a driver issue, like you said.
Maybe try Xubuntu, or maybe mate?
T
 
Steve A. 9/3/2017 5:07 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Gnobuddy View Post
And a very frustrating experience it is, when an update bjorks your system.

I have had that happen at least once with with every operating system I've used on a PC - Windows, OSX, Linux, and FreeBSD. Nothing is perfect, such is life!

-Gnobuddy
Knowing absolutely nothing about Linux I would venture to guess that recovering from an update that goes south is much easier with Linux than with Windows or the various Apple operating systems.
I've restored disk images on Windows machines but it is a real hassle restoring all of your data files newer than the image. Probably easier to restore the disk image to a fresh hd and copy files from the old hd as needed. As Terry recently pointed out it works better to access files on an old Windows boot drive using Linux!

Steve A.
 
big_teee 9/3/2017 7:08 PM
With my dual boot machines, just switch to the one that is working, and reload the other one.
Lots of times it is faster to load a new distro, than the hassle of fixing it.
Keeping all the personal data on a separate home, or storage partition.
If you want to load a ubuntu that is fully updated, you can download and install a daily build.
Run it on a SD stick, and if it works OK, load and run it. I do that off and on.
Index of /ubuntu-mate/daily-live
T
 
Gnobuddy 9/3/2017 9:16 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
Knowing absolutely nothing about Linux I would venture to guess that recovering from an update that goes south is much easier with Linux than with Windows or the various Apple operating systems.
It has been, in my experience. I've never had the actual filesystem go south, so, worst case, recovering files was usually as simple as booting from a Linux live-CD, and copying the data onto another hard drive.

I usually create a separate hard-disk partition just for user data, and most of the time, you can just re-install Linux onto the borked machine, telling the installer NOT to use that user data partition. After the new install is complete, I would edit a couple of configuration files, so that the fresh new Linux install would once again use that same old data partition. Presto, all your data is back!

One of the nice things about Linux is that you get all these great networking tools, free. When I get a new computer, I set the old one up as my data backup, and use a couple of network programs called rsync and ssh to copy my data over the network regularly, so I have a backup that's never more than a few days old on the old PC. That's saved my bacon a couple of times when a hard-drive failed suddenly.

The one thing I never had (and still don't have) is an off-site backup. I would be in trouble if the Fraser river flooded and my house went under water for a few days.

Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
As Terry recently pointed out it works better to access files on an old Windows boot drive using Linux!
It does indeed, and I've done that a number of times during the days when my wife still had a Windows computer in the house.

But the most satisfying case of that happening was when I got a phone call from a very upset woman, who turned out to be the wife of one of my neighbours co-workers. Her Windows PC had died, would not boot, taking with it *all* the photographs she'd ever taken of her daughter, from small child to young teenager. And she had no backup.

I was able to rescue all of her data with a Linux live CD, and copy it onto a few DVD-Rs (this was a few years ago, gigantic USB thumb drives didn't exist yet). She and her husband were hugely relieved. Turned out her husband played in a Beatles tribute band, and they gave me and my wife free tickets to their next show. That was fun, but the best part was being able to give that nice couple back their photos.

-Gnobuddy
 
DrGonz78 9/4/2017 1:12 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Gnobuddy View Post
But the most satisfying case of that happening was when I got a phone call from a very upset woman, who turned out to be the wife of one of my neighbours co-workers. Her Windows PC had died, would not boot, taking with it *all* the photographs she'd ever taken of her daughter, from small child to young teenager. And she had no backup.

I was able to rescue all of her data with a Linux live CD, and copy it onto a few DVD-Rs (this was a few years ago, gigantic USB thumb drives didn't exist yet). She and her husband were hugely relieved. Turned out her husband played in a Beatles tribute band, and they gave me and my wife free tickets to their next show. That was fun, but the best part was being able to give that nice couple back their photos.
Yup that is the greatest feeling when you save files on a crashed system. I have doing just that for many people since at least 2002. Back then I would run Knoppix as a live CD and 9 out of 10 times it was a breeze.
 
big_teee 9/11/2017 9:13 PM
Ubuntu will drop the flagship desktop Unity, next month when Ubuntu 17.10 comes out.
Guys and Gals either loved Unity or hated it, I was in the hated it group.
The New Ubuntu 17.10 will drop Unity, and adopt a version of the Gnome Desktop.
It will have a similar look to unity, but have some key changes.
No more Dash bar at the bottom, the new Ubuntu will have a Docking bar on the left.
No more closing the windows on the upper left, now the window controls will be on the upper right like most desktops.
I have it loaded on my HP test box, and here are some preview screenshots of the new `17.10 Ubuntu modified desktop.
It seems to be pretty easy to use.
Check it out!
T
 
The Dude 9/11/2017 9:18 PM
I'm curious, big_teee, have you any knowledge in regards to the supplied driver package? In other words, is the OS installation able to find most drivers on it's own, or do you have to go hunting for them after the install?
 
big_teee 9/11/2017 9:36 PM
The drivers are preloaded into the Kernel package.
See screenshot, it shows the issue of 17.10 has a kernel of 4.12.0-13 generic.
And, my default desktop is Mate 1.18.0.
That is all the latestest Ubuntu software.
To check drivers, I always run a new Distro live.
You can either download and burn a DVR, or load it to a USB memory stick.
With laptops, I always use the USB sticks.
There are several different ways to make a bootable memory stick with windows.
If you are interested in trying a live USB, I can help you dig into it.
T
Here is a link to make a live usb drive.
https://itsfoss.com/create-live-usb-...tu-in-windows/
 
Gnobuddy 9/12/2017 1:32 PM
Quote Originally Posted by The Dude View Post
...is the OS installation able to find most drivers on it's own, or do you have to go hunting for them after the install?
It's been many years since I've had to manually install drivers for any built-in PC hardware. In my experience, Linux got really good at auto-finding and auto-installing drivers long before Windows did, and only recently has Windows caught up.

As an example, many years ago I bought an HP laptop that came with Windows Vista. I found Vista utterly unusable, so I decided to wipe it and install Windows XP. Unfortunately, XP completely failed to identify much of the essential hardware on the laptop, including the built-in Nvidia graphics card, SATA hard drives, and even such basics as USB ports and motherboard audio. It took me several days of online research to find and manually download all the requisite XP drivers (at least half a dozen), and I ended up having to create my own Windows XP install CD, slip-streaming the necessary drivers onto it, so that the install CD would actually boot on that machine and "see" the SATA drives.

After spending a week to get XP installed and working fully on that laptop (I needed Windows for one single piece of software that wasn't available on Linux), I went ahead with the plan to add Linux as well. In complete contrast to the Windows XP install, the Linux installation was as simple as popping in the install CD, booting the machine, and clicking through a few prompts. No fuss, no muss, no driver-hunting, and about half an hour after popping in the Linux CD, I had a fully functional Linux laptop.

These days Windows 7 (corporate version, still used at my workplace, and still fully supported by MS) is pretty good about finding drivers as it installs, but this is a pretty recent phenomenon in the Windows world.

-Gnobuddy
 
bob p 9/12/2017 1:37 PM
The reason that the linux drivers are easy to find is because linux distributions ship with bloated kernels that provide support for everything including the kitchen sink. On the one hand, having support for everything built into the kernel or kernel modules makes things easier for users, but the code bloat has the disadvantage of increasing the memory demands of the system. For decades (wow how time flies) I've been building my own lean kernels that remove support for devices that I don't have in my system.

There are still some problems though -- Nvidia is a particular headache on Linux boxes because they won't allow access to their proprietary code, which forces you to build wrappers around what they do make available. The real problem with NVDA/Linux is that there's a guy named Terrence who is in charge of linux support, and he's too lazy to keep the code updated as compilers change. The result is that as the rest of the world moves onto more modern compilers they can't build the Nvidia drivers.
 
Gnobuddy 9/12/2017 2:17 PM
Quote Originally Posted by bob p View Post
The reason that the linux drivers are easy to find is because linux distributions ship with bloated kernels that provide support for everything including the kitchen sink.
When loadable kernel modules arrived, there was a perfectly good compromise. No need to bloat the kernel with built-in drivers, simply load modules as necessary.

Years ago, I did build my own kernels on both FreeBSD and Linux. I even used Gentoo Linux for years, which meant you built and compiled almost all the software on your PC. In those days, I found Debian and Debian-based Linux distributions slow and cumbersome, which is why I jumped through all the hoops to get things to run just a little faster.

Things change. Hardware got much faster - in a few short years bus speeds shot up, we got DDR, we got SATA, clock speeds flew through the GHz barrier and kept going. First Mepis Linux, and eventually Kubuntu - both Debian based - was now fast enough on my hardware, and I didn't need to waste precious hours of my life compiling kernels and operating systems.

Nvidia certainly brought its own headaches. I got off that train when Intels built-in GPUs became "good enough" for anything I do on my PC. Bye-bye, Nvidia!

For any experienced Linux user who wants to see just how incredibly fast and light Linux can be, even in 2017, download and try out Tiny Core Linux: Tiny Core Linux 7.1: Big Where It Counts | FOSS Force

In a classroom setting with no budget at all, I used Tiny Core to keep a dozen cast-off 200 MHz Pentium II machines with 64MB of RAM alive and kicking until 2014. Those machines were designed for Windows 95!

Tiny Core is a fun fast-and-light starting point for the experienced Linux user, but for those new to Linux, I suggest sticking with something from either the Ubuntu or Linux Mint family.

-Gnobuddy
 
bob p 9/12/2017 2:27 PM
Gentoo. Oh, how I remember the pain... complete system compiles on a P-class machine took and entire month of compile time. I had to build a distcc compiling farm in my basement.

http://forums.gentoo.org/viewtopic-p-2242733.html

Jackass! was built around squeezing every drop of performance out of the x86 architecture. I still have pentium-class file servers and firewalls in service that I built with Jackass! 2005.0. We had to phase out the 486 hardware when we broke our last ISA 10-base-T card.
 
big_teee 9/12/2017 3:31 PM
I like a full figured linux, not totally bloated, but with all the growable options.
I like the XFCE4 desktop cause it runs pretty snappy, but lots of bells & whistles can be added if need be.
I've tried tons of different distros, and always come back to Ubuntu-Mate/XFCE.
U-Mate is real stable, and does good with laptops.
I buy $300 laptops, and replace win 8, or win 10 with multi-boot linux.
I keep 4 or 5 distros on each laptop.
I have one laptop setup to test linux live, and to test loads.
The limiting factor to a lot of linux distros, is if you run GPT, with EFI.
A lot of the distros are just now getting round to supporting efi, and secure boot.
Ubuntu has supported them for years.
Whatever you run, however newbie or advance, it IMO is better than Windoz, welcome to penguin country!
T
 
big_teee 9/23/2017 3:40 PM
Here's another look at Ubuntu 17.10 with the Gnome Desktop.
It will be out 10-19-17.
I started with the new Ubuntu 17.10 which has a new version of gnome.
I like the classic gnome better, so I installed the 3.26 classic gnome, that way both desktops are loadable, and usable.
Here's some screenshot of it.
Actually pretty user friendly, and runs pretty fast too.
Have a look.
T
 
big_teee 9/29/2017 9:41 AM
Ubuntu Beta 2, came out today.
Development Release: Ubuntu 17.10 Beta 2 (DistroWatch.com News)
Ubuntu Official will be out on 10-19-17.
I've been running 17.10 with various desktops for past 6 weeks.
It has been a very stable OS, so far, and gets better with each update.
It is currently running on kernel 4.13.0-12 generic.
T
 
rjb 10/1/2017 12:05 AM
So, I just installed GalliumOS on my $150 refurbed Acer C720P Chromebook. I guess you'd call GalliumOS a lightweight Xubuntu optimized for Chromebook hardware, with XFCE desktop and Chrome browser.
https://galliumos.org/
Wondering if anyone else might have a similar setup, and some sage advice for a brand-newbie?

I installed with chrx to get a dual-boot system with GalliumOS alongside ChromeOS. Will probably eventually switch to GalliumOS single boot. According to the documentation, "chrx" is pronounced "marshmallow". I assume that's a joke, but I don't get it. https://wiki.galliumos.org/Installing

Seems to work, mostly, except for the touch screen- which now doesn't respond either in GalliumOS or ChromeOS. Maybe just a coincidence?

Also, there was a conflict between the power manager and xscreensaver, which I think I resolved by killing the latter.

And I noticed that the power manager predicts a battery life of ~6-1/2 hours, which is considerably shorter than the 9 to 11 hours I typically get under ChromeOS. I see that an "advanced power management tool" called TLP is available - which may either improve battery life or cause system instability. https://wiki.galliumos.org/Additional_Software Has anyone here tried TLP?

Youtube videos played without sound until I found the correct "source" checkbox in the volume control application.
I initially couldn't get windows to tile, but found the keyboard setup application that took care of that.

...Looks like I may be diddling for awhile.
Again, any handy tips would be greatly appreciated.

-rb

PS - I did install Audacity without a glitch. Haven't checked it out yet, but don't expect any problems.
 
Enzo 10/1/2017 2:14 AM
I hate to keep sticking in dumb questions, but I really want to get a handle on this stuff.

Once we are done configuring all this so it works, what all do we do with the system? I mean what functions better on the UNix than the plain old vanilla MS? I don't challenge my computer. I email, I do forums, and download schematics. I don't do RPGs or games at all beyond solitaire. I stream dumb You Tubes, but not movies. Not doing Pro Tools or other audio recording/processing. So where do these alternate systems shine? You guys must have uses beyond my very basic computing.
 
rjb 10/1/2017 8:07 AM
This may not answer your question, but the advantage of a Chromebook is that it is fast, portable, and cheap.
It does everything you've mentioned, and you can pick one up for under $200. With it's solid state drive, my system boots in about 2-3 seconds. Close the lid, and it goes into suspend mode; open the lid and its ready to go. Some disadvantages are that you must have a wireless router, and that the tasks you can perform off-line are pretty limited because most of the applications live on the cloud. Or something like that.

The advantage of Linux on a Chromebook is that both the operating system and most applications (which you can download and run off-line, like on a "normal" computer) are FREE. So, for instance, with a Chromebook and a thumb drive or two, you can carry an oscilloscope, a portable DAW, and the contents of the Real Book Vols 1-6 in the accessory pocket your gig bag.

-rb
 
nosaj 10/1/2017 8:49 AM
Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
I hate to keep sticking in dumb questions, but I really want to get a handle on this stuff.

Once we are done configuring all this so it works, what all do we do with the system? I mean what functions better on the UNix than the plain old vanilla MS? I don't challenge my computer. I email, I do forums, and download schematics. I don't do RPGs or games at all beyond solitaire. I stream dumb You Tubes, but not movies. Not doing Pro Tools or other audio recording/processing. So where do these alternate systems shine? You guys must have uses beyond my very basic computing.
It's not always about it being done better, but it being free, people writing many different apps for it or easily being able to rewrite programs.
Or not using using the corporate-fed garbage(which works well for most people)

nosaj
 
DrGonz78 10/1/2017 12:19 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
I hate to keep sticking in dumb questions, but I really want to get a handle on this stuff.

Once we are done configuring all this so it works, what all do we do with the system? I mean what functions better on the UNix than the plain old vanilla MS? I don't challenge my computer. I email, I do forums, and download schematics. I don't do RPGs or games at all beyond solitaire. I stream dumb You Tubes, but not movies. Not doing Pro Tools or other audio recording/processing. So where do these alternate systems shine? You guys must have uses beyond my very basic computing.
These alternate systems shine in the regard that they are perfect for basic Internet computing, just as you said "email, ...forums, ...download schematics...stream dumb You Tubes." That is exactly what I do on my Linux system. Where it shines, at least for now, is by not getting viruses and it does not slow down due to a bad registry dependant windows system. Windows registry generates huge amounts of errors over time and cleaning the registry might still not truly fix the errors. It is fun to run a system without a "REAL" need for anti-virus software which typically bogs down the speed of the computer. Windows updates are horrible too and take forever. Linux updates, I find, are much less intrusive. While I cuss & yell at Windows systems during many updates, I never even feel this way with linux updates.

As far as uses beyond basic computing... Sure they shine too, but first they should shine for basic computing. There are pros and cons to all of this but the biggest pro for me & Linux is just the basics.
 
Justin Thomas 10/1/2017 12:33 PM
Every time I need something on my Windows 10 machine that Windows wants me to pay for, my friend downloads me a free version from Linux /Ubuntu/whoever that works great, let's me update when it's convenient for me, and deosn' t want to "sync" everything together and make my life more complex than I want it... all this free stuff does exactly what I need ("just the basics") and no more.

Justin
 
g1 10/1/2017 12:53 PM
Quote Originally Posted by rjb View Post
Some disadvantages are that you must have a wireless router, and that the tasks you can perform off-line are pretty limited because most of the applications live on the cloud. Or something like that.
Cloud based apps are a deal-breaker for me. How much of the more basic type stuff is cloud only?
I need something that can do everything offline (aside from actual internet browsing or email type stuff).
 
big_teee 10/1/2017 1:14 PM
Linux is just an alternative to windows
I'm been MicroSux free for over 5 years now.
If you like your MS, keep your MS.
I for one like GNU free software, that works, & boots fast.
This is a Linux Ubuntu thread, and I just like to post when new distro downloads come out, and I like to promote and endorse Ubuntu Linux.
I don't use or endorse Windows, but I'm sure there are some that do!
Everything I need comes on a linux distro, or is easily downloadable from the ubuntu repository.
As far as Enzo's question that he asks, he will only get the answer when he tries it.
Linux is a choice, Like Ford, or Chevy, or Marshall vs Fender, or play gibson, or fender, PRS, or Gretsch, etc.
None are particularly wrong, just preferences, and choices!
Just pick what you like and go with it.
But, I will keep posting when new distros of linux come out, here on the Ubuntu thread!
As far as Chrome, a chromebook costs too much for what you get.
I stick with cheap laptops with a hard drive, Optic drive.
The last two I bought last year was my HPs 1tb hard drive 8gig ram, and optic read/writer, 15 inch led screen, $295 free shipping, and brand new.
Some great deals out there if you beat the bushes.
T
 
big_teee 10/1/2017 1:19 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Justin Thomas View Post
Every time I need something on my Windows 10 machine that Windows wants me to pay for, my friend downloads me a free version from Linux /Ubuntu/whoever that works great, let's me update when it's convenient for me, and deosn' t want to "sync" everything together and make my life more complex than I want it... all this free stuff does exactly what I need ("just the basics") and no more.

Justin
My cure for the win-10 issues, is to get rid of it.
Format the hard drive and load Ubuntu, I'm always glad to see win-10 gone.
I kind of liked win-7, but it is obsolete, and I had to recover way too often.
For me Linux is the only viable option, and my choice!
T
 
Gnobuddy 10/1/2017 2:11 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
Once we are done configuring all this so it works, what all do we do with the system?

I mean what functions better on the UNix than the plain old vanilla MS?
I would like to stress that, these days, there is very little to configure manually. Pop in the install DVD, or boot from a USB drive with the DVD image on it, answer a few prompts, and, 99% of the time, you'll have a fully functioning system after 30 minutes or so.

Your question is a a perfectly good one, and the answer is quite individual. Let me list a few of the reasons why I prefer Linux:

1) Stability. I first started tinkering with Linux (back around 1999 or 2000), because Windows 95 (and 98, and ME) was utterly unreliable, blue-screening a dozen or more times a day. Windows is hugely more stable today, but the stability advantage still remains: I used to run my own Linux server in my classroom, and many times, it has run all semester (say four months) without ever having to be rebooted. Even today, leave a Windows computer running for a month, and you'll usually find it's ground to a halt, or is behaving weirdly.

2) Security. This is a huge one; there are literally hundreds of thousands of viruses, worms, and other attacks (like cryptware/ransomware) in the wild for Windows. No operating system is perfectly secure, but Linux has proven itself to be vastly less susceptible to network nasties.

Windows supporters like to say that this is simply a matter of statistics, since Windows is much more widely used than Linux. That may play a role, but the Windows security nightmares started because early versions of Windows had absolutely no concept of any kind of security; Windows was built on an operating system designed to run on individual PCs in the days before Ethernet, when anyone with access to the PC had full control over every file on it. Even long after the Internet arrived, the almost wilful stupidity continued; for example, end any filename with the characters ".exe", and Windows would execute it if you clicked on it, without even asking the user first. So nasty people could send you emails with viruses attached (named "evilvirus.exe", say), and Windows would helpfully run the virus automatically if the unfortunate user clicked on it, infecting itself with no intervention from the user.

Linux, on the other hand, from the very start, inherited a security model from Unix; Unix was designed to run on big mainframe computers used by multiple people simultaneously, so it had built-in mechanisms that prevented one user from, for example, deleting data belonging to another user, or running arbitrary code. To execute a file, you have to specifically give it execute permission, and then run it; and even then, it has only the permissions given to it by the superuser (what Windows now calls the Administrator).

This is actually an excellent disproof of the consumerist mantra "You get what you pay for". Pay for Windows, and get ludicrously poor security; download Linux for free, and get vastly better security.

3) Usability after a clean install. To this day, Windows comes with precious little software included - not even a decent text-editor, so you have to download and install Notepad++ before you can even code up a simple HTML web page. By contrast, any of today's "full-fat" Linux distros comes with the majority of the software most people need to get started working. Need more? It's usually a couple of mouse-clicks away.

4) Geek tools. For those of us who like doing stuff ourselves, Linux is an operating system straight from heaven. Its filled with fantastic tools for building your own stuff, from the simple (programmers editors) to the complex (free compilers and interpreters for dozens of powerful programming languages, powerful networking tools), to the uber-complex (pro-audio software like Ardour, Musescore). Want to run a web server? Want to record multi-track audio? Want to code up an HTML/Javascript application? Want to learn some Python? Want to backup your PC over your home network? All the tools are available, and all are free.

5) Versatility. When Gnome developers changed their desktop software so I found it less usable, I simply switched to KDE. KDE was ruined for me when version 4 came out, so I switched to XFCE. By contrast, when Microsoft shoved Vista down our throats, or Windows 8, you had nowhere to go to escape their stupidity. One size fits all, and these days, it's usually programmed by twenty-something millenials whose brains revolve around video games, anime, social networking, video chatting, and other useless garbage that I have zero interest in.

6) Standards-compatible. Linux has tended to play nice with international standards from the start, for example, Firefox was fully W3C compatible while Internet Explorer was still a kludged-together dogs breakfast of broken and deliberately incompatible code. How would you feel if Chevy cars only worked on Chevy gasoline, which cost $8 USD/gallon, and Toyotas wouldn't run without Toyota gasoline, sold only at Toyota-owned gas stations, for a mere $9 USD/gallon? Yet that's what most proprietary software companies try to do, deliberately create software incompatibilities so that you are forced to buy your entire software stack only from one single vendor, no matter how much they cost. It's called "vendor lock-in", and the bean-counters love it, because it lets them gouge the customer.

MS was actually attempting to control the entire World Wide Web when they deliberately made Internet Explorer incompatible with 'Web standards. Their plan was that only pages written specifically for IE would display properly, so, in the long run, the entire 'Web would have to be written in such a way that only IE could render it properly. Other browsers would die, removing the threat of competition.

Thankfully, they lost that battle. Mozilla/Firefox played a role there, as did other browsers like Konqueror and Opera. Eventually smart-phones took over the world, MS completely failed to get a toe-hold in the brave new world of iOS and Android, and their plan to conquer the 'Web failed, for the most part.

6) Price. I'm perfectly willing to pay for a good tool, like the Maxtech hacksaw I bought a couple of years ago. It has a die-cast metal frame, a compound-action lever to adjust blade tension with very little finger effort, and it's rigid, straight and true, so it's a joy to saw with it. But I absolutely hate paying for a succession of expensive, crappy, unreliable, short-lived tools - like Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows Me, Windows Vista, or the annual version of MS Office, which brings nothing useful to the party, but merely a new file format that is deliberately incompatible with all your older documents.

Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
I don't challenge my computer. I email, I do forums, and download schematics. I don't do RPGs or games at all beyond solitaire. I stream dumb You Tubes, but not movies. Not doing Pro Tools or other audio recording/processing.
For your usage, any contemporary operating system would be sufficient. What would Linux bring you? Improved security, much greater control over what goes on with your computer, and a considerable ability to change things until they suit your tastes.

Would you find those benefits worthwhile? I don't know, it depends entirely on your opinion. If you have no beef with the way your current operating system works, then you have no reason to change, simple as that!

-Gnobuddy
 
Enzo 10/1/2017 3:23 PM
I appreciate the responses.

I always looked at Apple products (having never tried one) as existing to leverage you into only being able to use Apple software products. I didn;t want to support what I considered a predatory business practice. MS may be just as predatory, I don't know, but at least I can chose from a half dozen other brand apps like a word processor. it seems that many of you look at MS the same way as I see Apple. I note no one has mentioned Apple. I truly regret not stopping Windows updating to 10 from the 7 which was working fine.

I was expecting Linux ran protools five times faster or something, but apparently that isn't the point of it.
 
big_teee 10/1/2017 4:07 PM
One of the big reasons I like linux over others.
Apple computers hardly exist in my part of the world.
I've never had the opportunity to use one.
Used lots of PCs and Lots of Sun Unix machines in my retired telecomm world.
One of the big reasons I like linux over windows, is I have a better idea of what is being saved on the computer.
On a windows machine, you think you deleted something, only to find out it got saved in 10 other places, that you may have not known about.
I have a better idea of where the web browsing data and cache info is stored.
I wipe drives, and load often anyway. Mainly because I like new software.
with linux, I have better control of the data on my computer.

If you work and have to use windows and MS office, it is hard to totally cut free from windows.
I couldn't totally cut ties until retirement.
Now retired, there is no reason for me to keep using windows.
Also, like I say, another good reason, Linux is FREE!
YMMV,
T
 
Gnobuddy 10/1/2017 5:20 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
I always looked at Apple products (having never tried one) as existing to leverage you into only being able to use Apple software products. I didn;t want to support what I considered a predatory business practice.
I agree with you 100% here. The fascinating thing is that Steve Jobs mastered the art of ripping off his customers, while simultaneously having most of them worship and love him for ripping them off, because he managed to convince them that they were simultaneously superior to everyone else, and martyrs to the holy cause. You may have heard joking references to Steve Jobs "reality distortion field" - it is the same thing that other charismatic psychopaths throughout history have had, from Adolf Hitler to Donald Trump to the various fundamentalist televangelists and religious cult leaders.

Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
MS may be just as predatory,
From everything I ever read about Gates and MS, he/it was indeed just as predatory, but not as clever about it. People hated Gates when he ripped them off, while they loved Jobs when he ripped them off.

Do you know the story of how MS got its start? Bill Gates got rich selling QDOS (for Quick and Dirty Operating System) to IBM; but he didn't create QDOS, and has never shown any evidence that he was capable of coding anything that complex: he bought QDOS (cheap) from a very talented 24-year-old young man named Tim Paterson: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle_Computer_Products

Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
I don't know, but at least I can chose from a half dozen other brand apps like a word processor.
IBM (inadvertently?) created an open hardware standard with their PC, and multiple manufacturers jumped on both the hardware and software bandwagons. Both IBM and Microsoft therefore failed to create a total hardware/software monopoly, as Apple managed to subsequently do.

I think Microsoft (and Gates, specificially) spent years fuming at the fact that he never quite managed to pull off what Apple was doing. I'm sure his vast billions of personal wealth helped soothe him to sleep at night, though.

Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
it seems that many of you look at MS the same way as I see Apple.
I look at Apple the way you do, and at MS the way many tech-savvy people do. Both companies did indeed bring something useful to our society, but both companies' offerings come with strings attached, and sometimes those strings bind the end-user quite tightly.

Here's one of the many lovely things Apple does to their loving customers: Why I Ditched Apple Music | HuffPost

Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
I truly regret not stopping Windows updating to 10 from the 7 which was working fine.
Having "updates" thrust down your throat whether you want them or not, is a great example of MS software coming with strings attached. You don't own their software, you only license it from them, and on their terms; those terms got a lot more ugly when MS became desperate to force their users to migrate to Windows 10 whether or not they wanted to.

Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
I was expecting Linux ran protools five times faster or something, but apparently that isn't the point of it.
Linux is very flexible - it can be lean and mean and stripped down, like a motorcycle, or fat and heavy and slow, like the original AM General Hummer.

I have used lightweight Linux to keep ancient 200 MHz Pentium II PCs running all the way till 2014, but that was because this was a classroom situation where I had zero IT budget.

But if you have reasonably adequate modern hardware, you probably won't experience a huge speed boost from using Linux, especially if you use one of the cushy, luxurious distributions (like Ubuntu) that come with everything but the kitchen sink.

So yeah, I agree with you that more speed is rarely the reason to use Linux. That was true in the early 2000s when PC hardware could barely keep up with the weight of the software running on it. But the last few generations of PC hardware have been fast enough for most of us not to feel hindered too much by the slowness of our PCs.

At work I have a corporate Core i5 PC that was manufactured in 2012, and leased in 2013. It was recently upgraded to 8 GB of RAM, and the mechanical hard drive replaced with a 256 GB SSD (solid state drive). With the upgrades, even this five year old hardware flies - it boots in seconds, and most reasonable software runs quite fast on it. Unfortunately, at work I am forced to use that prize MS turd, Outlook, and it manages to bring this PC to its knees quite regularly. Click on an email, go get a cup of tea while Outlook bogs to a halt, come back ten minutes later and start typing.

That PC would definitely fly on Linux, but I can't even begin to guess how much trouble I'd be in if I put Linux on my work computer, so I have to suffer with the awfulness that is the Windows software ecosystem.

-Gnobuddy
 
rjb 10/1/2017 6:03 PM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
As far as Chrome, a chromebook costs too much for what you get.
I stick with cheap laptops with a hard drive, Optic drive.
That's good advice for most folks, but it really depends on whether you need a desk jockey or a road warrior.
Is your laptop going to spend its life sitting on a nice comfy desk, suckling power from a wall socket, or is it going to be tossed into a gig or messenger bag and used to make field recordings miles from the nearest AC outlet?

When I bought the 11" Chromebook (jeez, was it 2 years ago already?) I specifically wanted SSD and long battery life. I could've gotten a 15" (with much better speakers) for a few bucks more, but the battery life would have sucked. The 13" books might have been a nice compromise, but they all had ARM (vs x386) processors. So 11" it was. I did shop Windoze laptops at that time, but none had solid state drives (or at least not at a reasonable price).

Different strokes for different folks.

-rb
 
rjb 10/1/2017 6:17 PM
Quote Originally Posted by nosaj View Post
It's not always about it being done better, but it being free....
Or not using using the corporate-fed garbage(which works well for most people)
I forgot to mention that earlier.
The main reason for using Linux is to stick it to The Man. :sardonic_faux_anarchist:

-rb
 
Gnobuddy 10/1/2017 7:14 PM
Quote Originally Posted by rjb View Post
The main reason for using Linux is to stick it to The Man.
Not for me. I just want to be able to make my own choices about what I do with my computer, without artificial restrictions imposed by some corporation or the other.

"The Man" already has us all by the short hairs; these days "he" controls all the hardware in your PC, regardless of the operating system you use: https://boingboing.net/2016/06/15/in...ship-with.html

-Gnobuddy
 
rjb 10/1/2017 10:00 PM
Quote Originally Posted by g1 View Post
Cloud based apps are a deal-breaker for me. How much of the more basic type stuff is cloud only?
I need something that can do everything offline (aside from actual internet browsing or email type stuff).
I'm not here to sell Chromebooks, but it appears the answer is that the number of Chrome apps that work offline is ever-growing. I reckon it depends on what "everything" means for you.

Although ChromeOS is based on the Linux kernal, it does not run Linux apps. I installed GalliumOS, a xubuntu distro optimized for Chromebook hardware, to run Audacity, TinyCAD, Quite Universal Circuit Simulator, etc.

EDIT: For a normal person, LibreOffice might cover the bases.

https://www.computerworld.com/articl...t-for-you.html
One of the most common misconceptions I hear about Chromebooks is that they're completely useless without an active internet connection. In reality, a huge and ever-expanding number of compatible apps works both online and off, including things like Gmail and Google Docs as well as calculator apps, calendar apps, news-reading apps, games, and even Google Play Movies. (You can browse through the "Offline" section of Google's Chrome Web Store for many more examples.)
The truth is that for most people, using a Chromebook offline isn't terribly different than using a traditional PC offline. You aren't going to be able to get on the web or download new content, obviously, but aside from things that inherently require an active connection, there isn't a heck of a lot you'd want to do that wouldn't be available.
 
nickb 10/2/2017 12:31 AM
Quote Originally Posted by Gnobuddy View Post
,,,,The fascinating thing is that Steve Jobs mastered the art of ripping off his customers, while simultaneously having most of them worship and love him for ripping them off, because he managed to convince them that they were simultaneously superior to everyone else, and martyrs to the holy cause. You may have heard joking references to Steve Jobs "reality distortion field" - it is the same thing that other charismatic psychopaths throughout history have had, from Adolf Hitler to Donald Trump to the various fundamentalist televangelists and religious cult leaders.

-Gnobuddy
I thought I was the only one who despised Apple. I feel quite relieved.
 
Steve A. 10/2/2017 2:44 AM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
As far as Enzo's question that he asks, he will only get the answer when he tries it.
Damn — wasn't that what Nancy Pelosi said about Obamacare back in 2009 that got her in trouble ?

For the benefit of Enzo and the rest of us why not post some links for us to download a few tried and true distros that we can load onto a USB drive or burn to a CD/DVD... this is to run it from the external media, not install it, at least at first.

BTW I have a laptop I have hardly ever used from 2009 with Vista. I've listed all of the details below. I was thinking of putting in a new hard drive (which I already have) and installing a distro that you would recommend for someone who loved XP and Windows 2000, hated Vista and have put up with Windows 7 Home Edition Premium for way too long! Besides the basic browser and email client I want a file manager like the one in XP for moving files around and renaming them, etc. (that is my biggest complaint about Windows 7! )

The Fujitsu has a short battery so I'll probably keep it plugged in on my dining room tablet and connect to the internet via wifi. BTW does Linux require you to set a default browser (like Windows does) or can you "play the field" as you can with Android (I use several browsers because some sites do not work well with certain browsers on my circa 2014 tablet.)

Fujitsu Lifebook A6110
A6110, T5250, 15CECVWXGA, VHP, DVD, 1G, 160G, AWLN

https://www.notebookcheck.net/Fujits...10.7240.0.html

Fujitsu America - Support - LIFEBOOK A6110 Notebook PC

Steve A.
 
big_teee 10/2/2017 6:53 AM
As per Steve A suggestions.
To run linux live, you will need a usb writing app.
USB writer works fine and is small.
https://sourceforge.net/projects/usbwriter/
It is small and has an icon that sits on your windows desktop.
Next you will need a Linux .iso image file.
I suggest starting with a Linux Mint or a Ubuntu distro.
Most of the Mint distros have the panel on the bottom.
Most of the Ubuntu distros have the panel on the top.
On some Distros, the panel can be moved to the top or bottom.
Here are a few links.
https://linuxmint.com/download.php
I would go with mint XFCE, or Mate, for a first load.
For Ubuntu:
Development Release: Ubuntu 17.10 Beta 2 (DistroWatch.com News)
A very nice Ubuntu with top panel(can be easily moved to the bottom), and lots of music recording Studio software is Ubuntu Studio.
Ubuntu Mate, & Ubuntu, are both easy to learn with top panel.
Save the file to a folder location, where you can find it, or save it to the desktop.
Next you need to burn the down loaded image .iso to the usb with the usb writer.
Then you boot your computer with the usb drive.
You will have to go into your bios, and change the boot order to boot from usb first.
When your computer boots, select try linux in live mode.
Please report back here your results.
It is actually pretty easy.
If you don't like one linux, download and try another.
The great thing about it, it's all FREE!
GL,
T
 
rjb 10/2/2017 8:46 AM
So, back to my original question, has anyone tried GalliumOS on a Chromebook?
No? Oh well. OK then.

-rb

EDIT:
Broader question: Has anyone tried any Linux distro on a system with Solid State Drive?
Does it fly or what?
 
big_teee 10/2/2017 9:49 AM
My friend Allen in CA, runs a SSD, in a desktop.
He loves it.
I run laptops with conventional 2.5 inch SATA drives.
I make up for speed, by running additional RAM.
I have no issues with speed.
Most speed issues here in my area are ISP web speed issues, not computer hardware issues.
T
 
big_teee 10/2/2017 10:07 AM
I downloaded Ubuntu-Kylin, which is a chinese version of Ubuntu linux.
It starts off live in chinese, but if you install it to the hard drive, you can pick the english language installer, which I did.
Here are a few pics of it, I like the XP win look, with the bottom panel.
It is as easy to use as the old win98 or winXP.
They are using a modified Ubuntu Mate Desktop, for the platform.
I have it loaded on my HP linux test computer.
T
**If you run it live, you may want to brush up on your mandarin? :<)
 
Steve A. 10/2/2017 2:57 PM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
My friend Allen in CA, runs a SSD, in a desktop.
He loves it.
I run laptops with conventional 2.5 inch SATA drives.
I make up for speed, by running additional RAM.
I have no issues with speed.
Most speed issues here in my area are ISP web speed issues, not computer hardware issues.
T
When I booted up my NOS 2009 Fujitsu laptop this morning you could certainly hear and feel the hard drive. I have an SSD drive around here somewhere (bought for another project) and was thinking of putting it in to get more battery life.
As for RAM I've had compatibility problems in the past. Is there a good primer on modern RAM out there?

Steve A.
 
Steve A. 10/2/2017 3:15 PM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
I downloaded Ubuntu-Kylin, which is a chinese version of Ubuntu linux.
It starts off live in chinese, but if you install it to the hard drive, you can pick the english language installer, which I did.
Here are a few pics of it, I like the XP win look, with the panel.
It is as easy to use as the old win98 or winXP.
They are using a modified Ubuntu Mate Desktop, for the platform.
I have it loaded on my HP linux test computer.
T
What I liked about the XP file manager was that it was more text-based than Windows 7 which seems to be much more pixel-based. For example when you right-click in the file list pane the results depend on exactly where in the listing that you click, like whether it is white space or not. With XP it seemed like the file manager treated the listings more like cells in a spreadsheet where it did not matter where in the cell you clicked.

Another thing I liked about XP and Win2K was the file search module. Vista and higher started searching for text inside files and creating huge indexes whereas XP/W2K evidently searched the FAT tables first which was very fast.

As a workaround with Windows 7 I've been using an app called Everything which creates an index from the FAT tables of your drives each time it loads and after that the filename searches are lightning fast. I also use FileSearchEX which can optionally search for text within files, on any drive or folder that you specify. You can also search just for certain types of files, in several preset or user-designed categories.

I imagine that you could do all or most of that from the command line in Linux but it would be really nice if someone wrote a program to do that with a GUI interface. If there is already a program that does that I will be switching to Linux immediately. Swear to Buddha!

[img]http://music-electronics-forum.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=45160&amp;d=1506995390[/img]

[ATTACH=CONFIG]45160[/ATTACH]

Steve A.

P.S. Does Linux use right-click menus as extensively as Windows? IMO that was one of the most important features that MS added to their graphical interface in the past 20 years, something that the Mac never had with their single button mouse, at least until 2005. (That has been one of my biggest gripes about Adobe, their Windows apps — at least the older ones I've used — had a very limited palette of right click options since the Mac mice only had one button for over 20 years.)

P.P.S. Do any of the Linux variations offer good support for a touch screen? I picked up a Lenovo laptap with a touch screen running Windows 8.1 a few years ago, and missed the free upgrade to Window 10 by 2 days! Damn...
 
big_teee 10/2/2017 3:39 PM
With Linux, you can forget all about defrag, all the poweroff scanning issues, and no blue screens, that I'm aware of.
Linux has a app on the panel, called places.
From the panel, you pick what drive you want to open, and it cuts down on the file manager use.
Linux has a program call mc, or midnight commander that is good for file managetment.
It takes a little while to get out of the mindset of comparing linux programs to windows programs and tasks.
Most of the window tasks I used to do, I don't even think of anymore.
Most tasks are faster with linux.
I am impatient at times, and anytime you want a linux computer off, you can hold the power button down and it will turn off.
When it boots back up , it doesn't care how you powered it down, it just boots and works.
If you give a windows computer a hard power down, it goes ape the next time you reboot.
Do it two or three times in a row on a window machine, and it may not reboot at all.
Those are major differences in MS, and Linux.
Each linux desktop has it's own file manager, but they are all semi similar.
I can get by with most any of them.
T
 
Gnobuddy 10/2/2017 7:18 PM
Quote Originally Posted by rjb View Post
EDIT:
Broader question: Has anyone tried any Linux distro on a system with Solid State Drive?
Does it fly or what?
Yes, and yes!

I have a refurbished, off-lease Core i5 (probably at least 6 years old) that I bought from Staples a year or so ago. It's only got 4 GB of RAM, but the "hard drive" is a Samsung 256 GB SSD. I installed Xubuntu 16.04 (a stable version of Xubuntu that is supported for several years with security updates). It boots in seconds, and every application I use is extremely responsive - there really are no noticeable lags anywhere, except occasional ones when waiting for something to download from the Internet.

My wife has a 2013 or 2014 Core i3 that I assembled myself from parts bought from NewEgg. It has 8 GB of RAM, and whatever 256 GB SSD was on sale when I bought the parts for it. It's also running Xubuntu 16.04, and it boots even faster than my (older) Core i5. Once again, every application is extremely responsive, and the only thing that's slow enough to ever notice a lag is the Internet - which has nothing to do with Linux or the PC hardware, and everything to do with our Internet provider, and the state of British Columbia's network infrastructure (it's reeling under the insanely rapid population growth we're experiencing.)

I should mention that I don't play video games - I find the real world much more complex and interesting. So I can't report frame rates while bloodily slaughtering thousands of virtual creatures.

-Gnobuddy
 
Steve A. 10/2/2017 8:13 PM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
I downloaded Ubuntu-Kylin, which is a chinese version of Ubuntu linux.
It starts off live in chinese, but if you install it to the hard drive, you can pick the english language installer, which I did.
Here are a few pics of it, I like the XP win look, with the panel.
It is as easy to use as the old win98 or winXP.
They are using a modified Ubuntu Mate Desktop, for the platform.
I have it loaded on my HP linux test computer.
T
What I liked about the XP file manager was that it was more text-based than Windows 7 which seems to be much more pixel-based. For example when you right-click in the file list pane the results depend on exactly where in the listing that you click, like whether it is white space or not. With XP it seemed like the file manager treated the listings more like cells in a spreadsheet where it did not matter where in the cell you clicked.

Another thing I liked about XP and Win2K was the file search module. Vista and higher started searching for text inside files and creating huge indexes whereas XP/W2K evidently searched the FAT tables first which was very fast.

As a workaround with Windows 7 I've been using an app called Everything which creates an index from the FAT tables of your drives each time it loads and after that the filename searches are lightning fast. I also use FileSearchEX which can optionally search for text within files, on any drive or folder that you specify. You can also search just for certain types of files, in several preset or user-designed categories.

I imagine that you could do all or most of that from the command line in Linux but it would be really nice if someone wrote a program to do that with a GUI interface. If there is already a program that does that I will be switching to Linux immediately. Swear to Buddha!

[img]http://music-electronics-forum.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=45160&amp;d=1506995390[/img]

[ATTACH=CONFIG]45160[/ATTACH]

Steve A.

P.S. Does Linux use right-click menus as extensively as Windows? IMO that was one of the most important features that MS added to their graphical interface in the past 20 years, something that the Mac never had with their single button mouse, at least until 2005. (That has been one of my biggest gripes about Adobe, their Windows apps — at least the older ones I've used — had a very limited palette of right click options since the Mac mice only had one button for over 20 years.)

P.P.S. Do any of the Linux variations offer good support for a touch screen? I picked up a Lenovo laptap with a touch screen running Windows 8.1 a few years ago, and missed the free upgrade to Window 10 by 2 days!
 
big_teee 10/2/2017 8:39 PM
I don't think You're ever going to leave windows, I'll believe it when I see it!
But, it's fine either way.
I used XP and win 7 for years, but have no desire to go back.
Just updating the AV dat files, and trying to find decent free anti-malware was a pain.
Here's a pic of Thunar the FM that comes with XFCE desktops.
It does everything I need.
Also a pic of Midnight commander.\
You can do all kinds of file manipulation with it.
 
Steve A. 10/2/2017 8:42 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Gnobuddy View Post
I should mention that I don't play video games - I find the real world much more complex and interesting. So I can't report frame rates while bloodily slaughtering thousands of virtual creatures.
Me, neither — at least for the past 15 years or so. In the late 80's I really enjoyed games like Wolfenstein and a scary one called something like The Seventh Guest where you were walking around a haunted mansion.
The 90's brought Doom and Quake along with Warcraft 2, Starcraft and Diablo. I hooked up a second computer and created a network to play these games with my son as multi-player, always cooperative, since he was a much better gamer than me, having started using computers in 1988 when he was 3 (his choice, not mine.)
The original Diablo had a cheat for duping gold, etc. — if you cast it down on the ground just right it would be duplicated. I think that we spent more time duping gold than actually fighting the monsters underground... well, you wanted to be able to buy the best shit!
My son is 32 and gaming is still a big part of his life, just like music is a big part of mine.

Steve A.
 
Gnobuddy 10/3/2017 12:12 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
What I liked about the XP file manager was...
The nice thing about Linux is there is a lot of choice - there are plenty of different file managers to try out. Unlike Windows, you are not locked into whatever file manager came with the install CD.

Hopefully you will find a Linux file manager you like, but of course, I can't guarantee that you will.

My my own all-time favourite file manager was Konqueror on the 3.x versions of the KDE desktop. One of the things I liked about it was that it was good at letting you click on icons to select files, but it was also good at letting you type filenames - and entire directory trees - into it. So if you had two hundred music files in the folder /home/myname/music, you wouldn't be forced to stare at two hundred icons, trying to locate "Crowded_House_The_Very_Best_Of". Instead, you could type into the top of the Konqueror window "/home/myname/music/Crowd", and it would not only auto-complete the filename (show you a list of possibilities), but also take you straight to the folder you wanted once you selected the proper name and hit enter. No need to use the mouse at all, unless you wanted to.

This is exactly the kind of thing Apple - and typical Apple customers - don't want to see. If you're very right-brained, sorting through three hundred pretty translucent file folder icons may be more appealing than having to understand the logic behind a directory tree (like /home/myname/music/Crowded_House_The_Very_Best_Of). But if you're a little more left-brain oriented, like most of us on this forum, the concept of a directory tree - and the ability to type it in - can be a huge advantage in many cases.

Sadly, KDE went to hell in a handbasket when version 4 came along, taking Konqueror with it. After trying subsequent KDE versions intermittently for the next few years, only to find it continued to be slow and buggy, I finally gave up and moved on (to XFCE). XFCE comes with it's own file manager (Thunar), which I don't like as much, but such is life. The things you like best don't always stick around for the duration.

Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
Another thing I liked about XP and Win2K was the file search module.
Xubuntu comes with a lightweight file-search utility called Catfish. It's pretty fast. I don't use file search a lot (prefer to organize my files myself, and remember them that way). But my wife uses catfish, and, for the most part, likes it.

Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
I imagine that you could do all or most of that from the command line in Linux but it would be really nice if someone wrote a program to do that with a GUI interface. If there is already a program that does that I will be switching to Linux immediately. Swear to Buddha!
Why not put Linux on a USB3 thumb drive and boot from it, give Catfish a try, see if you like it. If you don't, no fuss, no muss, go back to your current operating system!

The Buddha was far too enlightened to care about such trivialities as anyone's operating system of choice. Baby Jesus is less sanguine, and he cries every time he finds someone using Windows.

By the way: XFCE usually comes with the "start bar" at the top of the window. I have to use Windows five days a week at work, and it has the start bar at the bottom. This is like driving a car with the gas pedal on the left on weekdays, and a car with the gas pedal on the right on weekends - very annoying, and a huge waste of time, because all your automatic "muscle memory" responses will be wrong on one operating system.

Fortunately, it's very easy to move the XFCE task bar to the bottom of the screen - it only takes a couple of mouse clicks. It's one of the first things I do every time I install Xubuntu. Life's too short to waste it hunting for the task bar!

Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
P.S. Does Linux use right-click menus as extensively as Windows?
Yes. And on Linux, middle click also has uses (every mouse I've seen in the last decade lets you click the scroll-wheel as the centre button). For example, you can select text in the usual way with the mouse, and then paste the selected text somewhere else by clicking the middle mouse button. Very quick and handy.

Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
P.P.S. Do any of the Linux variations offer good support for a touch screen?
No experience with this, so I can't answer you. Hopefully someone else will.

-Gnobuddy
 
big_teee 10/3/2017 12:28 PM
I also use the XFCE desktop because it is so customizable.
I use the Xfpanel-switch a lot.
Once I get the desktop like I want it, I save it to a folder, with the xfpanel-switch. It allows you to rebuild the panel with a file download.
Then when I load another distro, I always download the XFCE desktop if it doesn't come standard, and rebuild the panel, with xfpanel-switch.
I put my panel on the bottom, and install a small autohide side panel with most of the app icons on it.
When not in use It hides to the left.
I've tried a little of everything, and like this setup the best.
Especially good for small laptop screens, where space is of importance!
See SS.

T
 
Gnobuddy 10/4/2017 10:44 PM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
I use the Xfpanel-switch a lot.
Thank you for that tip, I had never heard of xfpanel-switch until now.

Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
I put my panel on the bottom, and install a small autohide side panel with most of the app icons on it.
When not in use It hides to the left.
Interesting! Hey, if it works for you...

One thing I hate about Apple's OSX is the fact that, in effect, it has two panels, one on the top edge, and one on the bottom edge, of the screen. That means I never know which of the stupid panels contains the launcher for the application I want. It's like having to hunt for your clean socks in every room in the house, instead of in the top drawer of the dresser by your bed. It takes much longer, and leaves you frustrated.

I've always found Apple products quite user-unfriendly, at least to my brain. Completely at odds with their purported design philosophy. You have to drag the CD icon to the trash-can icon to eject a CD from the computer? You've gotta be kidding me! Why not require that the keyboard be held upside down at the same time, too, while you stand on one foot? That would make just about as much sense.

-Gnobuddy
 
Enzo 10/5/2017 12:57 AM
It only works that way in the southern hemisphere.
 
Gnobuddy 10/5/2017 2:19 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
It only works that way in the southern hemisphere.
No, no, they have to stand on the other foot, and hold their Apple iThingy right side up! Everything has to be the opposite of what happens in the northern hemisphere...

-Gnobuddy
 
big_teee 10/19/2017 1:50 PM
Ubuntu 17.10 Official was released today.
Here are 3 different desktop versions.

Xubuntu (XFCE)
Distribution Release: Xubuntu 17.10 (DistroWatch.com News)

Ubuntu Mate
Distribution Release: Ubuntu MATE 17.10 (DistroWatch.com News)

Ubuntu (Gnome Signature )
Distribution Release: Ubuntu 17.10 (DistroWatch.com News)

I've ran all three of them for the past couple months.
Great Stuff!
T
**
DID I MENTION THEY'RE FREE?
 
big_teee 11/11/2017 12:16 PM
Here's some Screenshots of Emmabuntus, I installed a while back on my test computer.
It is built on Debian 9 Stretch, and looks like halfway between debian and ubuntu.
Ubuntu is also built from Debian, and debian and ubuntu use the same apt package manager.
I'm using the XFCE desktop with Emmabuntus Icons.
A nice alternative to Ubuntu, if you want a change of desktop look.
And, It's Free!
https://distrowatch.com/?newsid=09978
T
 
Steve A. 11/11/2017 1:39 PM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
Here's some Screenshots of Emmabuntus, I installed a while back on my test computer.
It is built on Debian 9 Stretch, and looks like halfway between debian and ubuntu.
Ubuntu is also built from Debian, and debian and ubuntu use the same apt package manager.
I'm using the XFCE desktop with Emmabuntus Icons.
A nice alternative to Ubuntu, if you want a change of desktop look.
And, It's Free!
https://distrowatch.com/?newsid=09978
T
Do these different distros change the functionality of Linux or are they like using different desktops or screen savers with Windows? I don't care a hoot what my screen looks like as long as it allows me to perform tasks easily.

BTW one of my favorite Windows "applets" from the 90's was WinBatch from Wilson Window Ware which allowed you to automate operations with batch files using plain English. (Norton licensed this product for use in their Norton Desktop for Windows.)

I understand that you can do all of that and so much more on the command line in Linux... is there anything like that in a user friendly format? (With the nerve damage to my hands I'd rather just click than type in command lines!)

Steve A.

P.S. I am finally getting somewhere in my massive condo declutter project so I will have room in my 850 sq ft space to run multiple computers with multiple OS's! I do need one running XP for my older programs like Adobe Acrobat 7 which do not run on Windows 7 and up. So is there a good Linux PDF editor which will do things like the global cropping of pages throughout a PDF file or the addition, deletion and reordering of individual pages? I really miss being able to do stuff like that these days...

Is there a place like the Google Play Store or the Apple Store to look at all of the apps or programs available for the Linux platform? Thanks!
 
big_teee 11/11/2017 3:46 PM
Each linux distro comes packed a little different.
Each type of linux uses its own update and package manager format.
There is pretty much a gui for everything.
No fancy PDF viewers in linux, they are all very basic.
You can view a pdf from LibreOffice program.
I use a stand alone program Atril, for pdf's.
See Screenshot of Atril.
I try not to get attached to any particular program.
Just so the app will accomplish the task at hand.
I have standard linux apps I add to any linux I install.
Aisleriot (Solitaire)
MahJongg
Pysol (More games)
Gnome-Calculator
Gnote- sticky note app
Clamtk-Antivirus
Mate-System-Monitor
GTK-Hash- (Download Hashsum checker)
Firefox, if not in factory load
PulseAudio for sound
Gnome-Screenshot app
XFCE-Terminal for command line.
MC-Midnight Commander (file manipulator)
XFCE4-Eyes program
That is most of what I always install, plus all the stock programs that come with the Distro Load.
I download all of the above with apt commands in Terminal.
I can install all of those in command line, in 10-15 minutes.
Example to install mahjongg I would input the following.
# apt install gnome-mahjongg
Very Easy inputs.
Most things I do are repetitive, and once learned, can be easily repeated!
GL,
T
 
big_teee 11/15/2017 1:52 PM
On an intermediate/advanced linux user theme?

On two of my Ubuntu Laptops I have Partitions with private folders and documents.
I wanted to make my linux OS ask for a root password before the partition could be mounted and opened.
I leave this partition unmounted most of the time.
If for some reason another network user got control of my OS, they could not open these files and folders, without the password.
This is built in to Debian, Redhat Fedora and some other Linux distros, but not in Ubuntu.
Root privileges are controlled by internal programs called policykits.
There are a bunch of them.
Ubuntu uses one called policykit-desktop-privileges
This policykit defeats the need to ask for any desktop root password.
So by removing it, now it asks for root password before my storage drive partition can be mounted and opened.
This is the command
#apt remove policykit-desktop-privileges
Don't know if anyone else has a need for this, but it works slick!
Good Luck all you Linux Penguin lovers out there!
T
 
imf 11/21/2017 1:54 AM
I run Xubuntu as my PC Desktop OS for the past few years because I have been fond of XFCE for quite some time now, which I was always running on other distros and OS's before Ubuntu. Now I am lazy and don't care for crazy setups unless it's a custom server, Ubuntu is great out of the box. You could easily switch to XFCE from Untiy on Ubuntu, or any try any other window manager or desktop environment you wish, and be able to switch back and forth at the login menu quite easily.

Though I will say Mac OS is superior in every way to Linux and I use that for my recording software, and the hardware is fantastic from Apple. I am a bigger fan of the *BSD OS's than GNU/Linux.
 
imf 11/21/2017 1:55 AM
 
Gnobuddy 11/27/2017 9:05 PM
Quote Originally Posted by imf View Post
Though I will say Mac OS is superior in every way to Linux
Oh no, here we go again!

I know many people love Macs and Mac OS, and of course, they're entitled to their opinions. I accept that you find Mac OS "superior in every way to Linux".

But that is not at all the case for me!

Some years ago, my wife had a Mac, and I had a PC I built myself, running Linux (Mepis, I think). Her Mac, after the educational discount, still cost more than twice as much as the PC I assembled from parts bought from Fry's Electronics (California chain). My half-the-price PC ran rings around her slow Mac - Intel CPUs of the time were so much faster than Apples outdated Motorola PowerPC G4 that it wasn't even funny.

And the styling? I found the mouse-grey Mac housing very ugly (see attached Powermac G4 pic). As for the vulnerable, grille-less, Cyclops speaker, I found it both ugly and idiotic. My PC wasn't a thing of beauty, but had a reasonably smart-looking Antec case in black and brushed silver. To me it was much less ugly than the G4.

What about the oh-so-brilliant Apple operating system? I have a fairly typical engineering/analytical personality like so many on this forum, and I've worked on a lot of operating systems over the years, from ancient Russian main-frame computers, to DOS on early PCs, to Solaris on Sparc hardware, and even oddballs like the BeOS on PC hardware. I managed to get to terms with all of them, enough to use them.

But the Mac? Of all of the operating systems I ever used, it was the the Mac that most often drove me mad with frustration. Nothing worked in any kind of logical way, and everything was hidden from you, so when it failed, (which happened fairly often), you had no idea what had gone wrong, or how to fix it.

Want to eject a CD? Oh, you have to drag the CD icon to the trash can icon. Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. Like having two panels, one on top of the screen and one on the bottom, wasting precious screen real estate, and forcing you to hunt for twice as long to find anything. Or like the stupid hockey-puck circular mouse that was cartoonish, stupid, and ergonomically toxic. Or the network printing based on the same CUPS software as Linux, only completely unreliable, while the free CUPS versions in my free Linux distributions were all rock-solid.

Quote Originally Posted by imf View Post
and I use that for my recording software,
This is one area where I do agree with you. Audio on Linux is still an ugly mess. Windows is loathsome because of its insecurity, the ugly corporate attitudes behind it, and its constant attempts to spy on you. Apple is "least worst" of the bunch.

Quote Originally Posted by imf View Post
the hardware is fantastic from Apple.
When it comes to desktop hardware, in the PowerPC days, Apple hardware cost two and a half times as much, and ran at one-third the speed. Nowadays, Apple hardware costs twice as much, but basically consists of entirely generic Intel motherboards and CPUs and video subsystems, so it runs at the same speed.

The only real difference is a chip Apple puts on their motherboards to announce to the operating system "Yes, I'm a real Apple motherboard!" on every boot, and to force you to pay twice as much for the same hardware. Just ask the Hackintosh crowd, they routinely run OSX on generic Intel-based hardware...all they have to do is play a minor trick at boot time so OSX thinks it is hearing from that worthless chip on the motherboard.

Quote Originally Posted by imf View Post
I am a bigger fan of the *BSD OS's than GNU/Linux.
I wanted to be - I liked some of the philosophy around BSDs, in particular, the fact that all the software was integrated and packaged together, rather than the piece-meal assembly of a Linux distribution. I tried FreeBSD a number of times. It was always rock-solid, but also always limited compared to Linux, particularly when it came to drivers for some piece of hardware that worked perfectly under Linux. Either it would be my digital camera, or my USB scanner (remember those?), or my Wacom tablet, or something.

In the end, it was all too obvious that FreeBSD development was painfully slow compared to Linux, which shot ahead in leaps and bounds. The other BSDs were even worse off than FreeBSD, and have mostly retreated to the level of hobby operating systems.

FreeBSD, at one time, at least used to be a great, rock-solid server OS. These days? I have the feeling Linux caught up in the stability department, and exceeded BSD in other software capabilities (like virtualization). For whatever reason, I rarely hear about FreeBSD servers any more.

-Gnobuddy
 
imf 11/28/2017 12:14 AM
Quote Originally Posted by Gnobuddy View Post
What about the oh-so-brilliant Apple operating system? I have a fairly typical engineering/analytical personality like so many on this forum, and I've worked on a lot of operating systems over the years, from ancient Russian main-frame computers, to DOS on early PCs, to Solaris on Sparc hardware, and even oddballs like the BeOS on PC hardware. I managed to get to terms with all of them, enough to use them.

But the Mac? Of all of the operating systems I ever used, it was the the Mac that most often drove me mad with frustration. Nothing worked in any kind of logical way, and everything was hidden from you, so when it failed, (which happened fairly often), you had no idea what had gone wrong, or how to fix it.

Want to eject a CD? Oh, you have to drag the CD icon to the trash can icon. Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. Like having two panels, one on top of the screen and one on the bottom, wasting precious screen real estate, and forcing you to hunt for twice as long to find anything. Or like the stupid hockey-puck circular mouse that was cartoonish, stupid, and ergonomically toxic. Or the network printing based on the same CUPS software as Linux, only completely unreliable, while the free CUPS versions in my free Linux distributions were all rock-solid.
I'm not sure what you are talking about here with any of this. Are you arguing about OSX from > 10+ years ago? If so we can we remember how bad Linux was with a lot of things at the time, and way worse with drivers than BSD is at the current time... that's not even getting into the mess they call the Linux kernel - which is still a mess today IMO.

Furthermore, find me one off the shelf PC notebook that can touch a Mac... again maybe 10 years ago when IBM was making thinkpads, but not anymore. Maybe Dell precisions are close? But I've had my fair share of problems with Dell. This Mac over here is as solid as it gets. Nobody uses PC laptops that have the ability to buy macs unless they are absolute Mac haters... like yourself

Quote Originally Posted by Gnobuddy View Post
I wanted to be - I liked some of the philosophy around BSDs, in particular, the fact that all the software was integrated and packaged together, rather than the piece-meal assembly of a Linux distribution. I tried FreeBSD a number of times. It was always rock-solid, but also always limited compared to Linux, particularly when it came to drivers for some piece of hardware that worked perfectly under Linux. Either it would be my digital camera, or my USB scanner (remember those?), or my Wacom tablet, or something.

In the end, it was all too obvious that FreeBSD development was painfully slow compared to Linux, which shot ahead in leaps and bounds. The other BSDs were even worse off than FreeBSD, and have mostly retreated to the level of hobby operating systems.

FreeBSD, at one time, at least used to be a great, rock-solid server OS. These days? I have the feeling Linux caught up in the stability department, and exceeded BSD in other software capabilities (like virtualization). For whatever reason, I rarely hear about FreeBSD servers any more.

-Gnobuddy
I agree the drivers can be an issue depending on your needs, which is why I think for a PC desktop OS, Ubuntu or the like is perhaps the better choice. As far as BSD, I'm actually partial to NetBSD and OpenBSD over FreeBSD. There are other interesting BSDs on the up as well. I disagree that the development is painfully slow, but it doesn't really sound like you keep up on them much.

The question is, where is it that you think Linux shot ahead "leaps and bounds"? I'd argue it's on the desktop mostly. They have come a long way as big companies invested to do so. It's network stack still isn't as good to this day, and they have opened a can of worms with systemd.

The only Linux distro I'd actually use on a personal server is one without systemd. Gentoo is good with openRC... maybe Slackware, but I'd still take BSD all day on my own server. There are various other reasons why small startup companies and even some big names are choosing Linux now over BSD in some areas... which have nothing to do with Linux being better suited for the job in any way. Like the fact it's cheaper to hire linux sysadmins than BSD, and there are corporate companies supporting it (Canonical and Redhat) which had much to do with the success Linux has had over BSD.

BSD is definitely still used at some big names and for good reason... storage systems, firewalls.

And lastly... I'm not sure what you mean with "exceeded BSD in other software capabilities (like virtualization)", if you care to explain.

Linux has its place as does BSD and OSX... I will absolutely stand by my comment in every way that OSX is the best Desktop OS currently in existence.


Edit: I'd like to add, my Mac notebook did not cost twice as much as a PC at all. It was in the same ballpark as a PC with similar specs.
 
big_teee 11/28/2017 8:49 AM
This is a Ubuntu linux thread.
Primarily to promote Ubuntu, and Linux Mint!
My intent, when I started this thread, was to promote new users to try and to use Linux.
Not scare new users away with how complicated it can be.
Linux, like windows, can be simple and graphical (GUI).
Ubuntu and Mint are very easy to use and install, and can be easier to use IMO than windows.
So if you are a complex user, and are coming to this thread to argue about all the different OS problems, and issues?
Maybe we need to start another thread for that?
You don't need to be an engineer to use Linux.
Ubuntu, and Mint are very easy to use out of the box.
They can be loaded and used by nearly anyone!
Please give them a try, and yes they are still FREE!
https://linuxmint.com/
https://www.ubuntu.com/
Thank You,
Terry

**To try linux, download it, put it on a DVD, or USB, and try it temporarily live.
Then to go back to windows, remove the DVD or USB and reboot back to windows.
Very painless!
 
Gnobuddy 11/28/2017 10:04 AM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
Maybe we need to start another thread for that?
You are right, I have said my piece, and there will be nothing more from me on the subject.

Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
To try linux, download it, put it on a DVD, or USB, and try it temporarily live.
And this amazing ability, still unavailable from Windows or OSX, has been widely available in the Linux world since 2003, when Knoppix Linux arrived. (Knoppix was not the first Linux live-CD, but it was the first one that was really good, and was widely and freely distributed over the Internet.)

Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
Then to go back to windows, remove the DVD or USB and reboot back to windows.
Very painless!
The only painful part being, you are back in Windows!

For those who get past the "Try a Linux live-USB" stage, you can also install both Windows and Linux on the same computer, and choose which one you want each time you start up the computer. I did this for a few months around the year 2000, when I had not yet found Linux alternatives for all the Windows software I used at the time, and so I would go back and forth between them. But by 2001, that had changed, and I found I was never booting into Windows any more.

(After 2004 I got into another hobby that required a Windows-only application, and went back to dual-booting for a few years, just for that one single application.)

But big_teee's basic point is worth underscoring: if you are a typical computer user, Linux is easy to try, and quite likely will meet your needs. If you are a more advanced computer user with a technical mindset, Linux will very likely meet your needs, because you will know how to make it do so. This is why engineering and science and research departments are full of Linux users.

The people least likely to be served by Linux are very specialized computer users, who spend their time using extremely expensive proprietary software (3D CAD, custom financial or CRM software, etc). That type of software will often not have a Linux version.

-Gnobuddy
 
big_teee 11/28/2017 10:22 AM
I also did the dual boot on my Wife's computer.
Windows shared with Ubuntu.
I did that so my granddaughter could use the windows.
That was the intent, but Linux runs so much faster, everyone uses the Ubuntu, not the win10.
I have 4 laptops that I personally use, all multi-boot linux only.
When I buy a new laptop, I swap the hard drive out and stick it in a drawer for about a year.
That way if I need windows for something, then I have it.
Then I reformat and install linux on the year old, and older drives.
Long live the Penguin!
T
 
Enzo 11/28/2017 12:08 PM
I know you like to start threads with some specific purpose and never stray from it. But I have to say until you just said that, I was not aware your purpose was to promote it in any way. I thought you wanted a technical discussion of it.

To me, I haven't seen a lot of reason to switch. Unless you just like futzing with computers, which is OK. I don't get the screen shots, they all just look like computer screens to me. Unless the subtle differences in function names and button positions is what matters. I am not saying you didn't convince me, I am saying I didn't see anything as selling it to me.

For example dual boot PCs. I guess in this day of terabyte hard drives, why bother to remove the original windows? Just make the other your default and leave it there.

MAy I suggest for next time a thread title like "Why you would like Ubuntu" or something. I do appreciate that my questions were handled.
 
Enzo 11/28/2017 12:09 PM
I know you like to start threads with some specific purpose and never stray from it. But I have to say until you just said that, I was not aware your purpose was to promote it in any way. I thought you wanted a technical discussion of it.

To me, I haven't seen a lot of reason to switch. Unless you just like futzing with computers, which is OK. I don't get the screen shots, they all just look like computer screens to me. Unless the subtle differences in function names and button positions is what matters. I am not saying you didn't convince me, I am saying I didn't see anything as selling it to me.

For example dual boot PCs. I guess in this day of terabyte hard drives, why bother to remove the original windows? Just make the other your default and leave it there.

MAy I suggest for next time a thread title like "Why you would like Ubuntu" or something. I do appreciate that my questions were handled.
 
minim 11/28/2017 12:52 PM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
I have 4 laptops that I personally use...
Four?!? I'm assuming that at least one is ensconced in GladWrap ��
 
big_teee 11/28/2017 4:49 PM
Quote Originally Posted by minim View Post
Four?!? I'm assuming that at least one is ensconced in GladWrap ��
I admit, I have a laptop fetish! lol
I have one in the Living room, I use at my recliner.
It has had a fall or two, and is not in the greatest shape, but still works fine.
I have a 4 year old Toshiba, that has a bios problem, that I'm fixing to work on.
It will not boot on any external mdeia anymore.
I have a last years model Blue HP 15, that I use to test linux loads with, it currently has 5 or six distros on it.
And, I have the new i5, that I pulled the windows drive, and put a linux replacement drive in.
I am going to put it in place of the Toshiba, while I work on it.
The Toshiba will get fixed, or get a Viking Funeral!
My wife has a Red Model 15 HP,(laptop #5) that I maintain, but don't use, cause she says I'm always changing everything.
I don't get user privileges with it.
They are all cheapies, and the most expensive one was the i5 version, and I gave $350 for it.
So with 4, at least one should work at a time!
None in glad wrap! None with windows, all with 2 or more linux distros loaded.
T
 
Gnobuddy 11/29/2017 8:32 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
To me, I haven't seen a lot of reason to switch.
Just today, I got an email message in my work inbox from Microsoft Quarantine. It informed me that Microsoft had caught a message they thought might be spam, and had quarantined it for me, and what would I like them to do about it?

What the heck? What I'd like is for Microsoft to stay out of my inbox, and not snoop through all my incoming email. My employers already do that; I accept that work email is not private, but there is a big difference between my employer scanning my work email, and Microsoft, the powerful and unethical corporation, scanning through it.

I have never heard of Microsoft Quarantine before, but I'm assuming this is now part of the "service" you get if you're an Outlook user (unwillingly, in my case).

This sort of completely unwarranted intrusion into my life would, all by itself, be enough to make me switch to Linux.

Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
Unless you just like futzing with computers, which is OK.
In my case, I did like futzing with PC hardware circa 1998 or so, when it was all new to me. I'm not particularly interested in PC hardware these days, but I am interested in the frightening amount of corporate and government snooping that goes on when you use Microsoft or Windows. And the staggering number of security vulnerabilities in Windows, in particular.

I also find I can get more stuff done with Linux on my computer, than with Windows. I am currently forced to use Windows at work, so I see this difference every day, from needless double-clicking in Windows, to stupid software layouts that force multiple mouse movements and mouse clicks when one click does it in Linux, to the simple fact that a fresh install of Linux comes with most of the software you need to do most computing tasks, all of it free.

Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
I don't get the screen shots, they all just look like computer screens to me.
Pretty much the same here...I usually do customize my desktops to my tastes, but I can do that on most any operating system, I don't particularly expect you to like my choices, and it isn't an important feature to me in any case.

But not having MS snoop through my email? Not living in fear of some creep encrypting my hard drive and trying to extort a ransom? Not having bizarre limitations forced on me (such as not being able to type an HTML page in Notepad and save it with a .html extension on Windows, which insists on attaching a ".txt" to the filename)? Those things are all well worth fleeing Windows for, in my book.

An analogy: Suppose you bought a car made by a company called MightyScabia, or MS, for short. It turns out the door locks don't work well, so every time you come back to your parked car, there is a vagrant snoring in the back seat, the seat-covers and floor mats are missing, and there are dried bloodstains on the dashboard. There is also a note saying that someone stole your passport out of the glove-box, and is demanding a $1000 ransome for its return.

When you ask around, it turns out that this sort of thing happens to about 50% of people who own the same car. Would you buy an other MightyScabia after that experience?

I don't understand why people put up with the amount of @$%& stuff that happens when you use Windows. People would not put up with equally shoddy security in any material product - why does MS get a free pass?

-Gnobuddy
 
big_teee 11/29/2017 8:48 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
I know you like to start threads with some specific purpose and never stray from it. But I have to say until you just said that, I was not aware your purpose was to promote it in any way. I thought you wanted a technical discussion of it.

To me, I haven't seen a lot of reason to switch. Unless you just like futzing with computers, which is OK. I don't get the screen shots, they all just look like computer screens to me. Unless the subtle differences in function names and button positions is what matters. I am not saying you didn't convince me, I am saying I didn't see anything as selling it to me.

For example dual boot PCs. I guess in this day of terabyte hard drives, why bother to remove the original windows? Just make the other your default and leave it there.

MAy I suggest for next time a thread title like "Why you would like Ubuntu" or something. I do appreciate that my questions were handled.
I'm not trying to sell you on anything.
If it's not for you, fine.
I do like messing with computers.
I do like trying different things.
Like the amp guys labor over every cap and resistor.
Try it if you like, don't try it if you don't.
I do screen shots some to show non linux users what it can look like.
As far as the thread name change?
You only get one shot at naming the thread, you can't change it, unless you are the mod for the sub-forum.
Also the thread was started in 2012, and been around a long time!
Thread name Ubuntu is fine! It tells what it is about, UBUNTU.
T
 
Enzo 11/29/2017 10:02 PM
Gnobuddy, I make this observation: You don't like Microsoft looking through your email for malware, but I bet you have some sort of antivirus software going, and that means SOMEONE is looking through your email.

tee, I was responding to this:
This is a Ubuntu linux thread.
Primarily to promote Ubuntu
I didn't accuse anyone of selling, but promoting comes close. I merely suggested NEXT TIME a more descriptive title might help. I didn't realize your purpose was to promote it, I thought you just wanted to talk about it.

As to amp guys: Some start threads like "MY Twin Reverb red plates power tubes", while others title the same thread "Amplifier issues".

I don't know where else to ask my dumb questions. Most of them only occur to me while reading through your thread. So I ask them here.
 
big_teee 11/29/2017 10:08 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
Gnobuddy, I make this observation: You don't like Microsoft looking through your email for malware, but I bet you have some sort of antivirus software going, and that means SOMEONE is looking through your email.

tee, I was responding to this:

I didn't accuse anyone of selling, but promoting comes close. I merely suggested NEXT TIME a more descriptive title might help. I didn't realize your purpose was to promote it, I thought you just wanted to talk about it.

As to amp guys: Some start threads like "MY Twin Reverb red plates power tubes", while others title the same thread "Amplifier issues".

I don't know where else to ask my dumb questions. Most of them only occur to me while reading through your thread. So I ask them here.
That is all fine and good.
I always get the impression you're getting on to me for my obsession with computers and linux.
One of the few thrills I have left!
T
 
big_teee 11/29/2017 10:10 PM
Also, I can't sell if, there's nothing to buy!
IT'S FREEE.
 
Enzo 11/29/2017 10:56 PM
Nah, your obsession is fine. Some guys like fishing, some like NASCAR, some like computers. I don't care for any of those things. But I might ask a guy how he catches a 20 pound fish on "4 pound" line. I might ask a NASCAR guy if their ignition systems use the computer boxes or some other system. And I want to understand the attractions here. That's all.
 
Steve A. 11/30/2017 4:55 AM
Quote Originally Posted by Gnobuddy View Post
Just today, I got an email message in my work inbox from Microsoft Quarantine. It informed me that Microsoft had caught a message they thought might be spam, and had quarantined it for me, and what would I like them to do about it?

What the heck? What I'd like is for Microsoft to stay out of my inbox, and not snoop through all my incoming email. My employers already do that; I accept that work email is not private, but there is a big difference between my employer scanning my work email, and Microsoft, the powerful and unethical corporation, scanning through it.

I have never heard of Microsoft Quarantine before, but I'm assuming this is now m,part of the "service" you get if you're an Outlook user (unwillingly, in my case).
Microsoft Outlook and Quarantine are components of Office 365 so your employer has given Microsoft permission to snoop in your email scanning for viruses and other malware. I guess you are using your employer's computer so you probably have no say in the matter.

https://support.office.com/en-us/art...5-98fcccfc639b
 
Gnobuddy 11/30/2017 7:54 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
Gnobuddy, I make this observation: You don't like Microsoft looking through your email for malware, but I bet you have some sort of antivirus software going
Nope, no anti-virus software. Google for Linux viruses "in the wild", and see what you come up with - there aren't any! So there's no need to run anti-virus software on a Linux computer, particularly if you use a well supported distribution and apply all security patches promptly. I use Xubuntu LTS (Long Term Support), for which security updates are provided for five years, by which time, I will move to the next newer LTS version.

You may be right that someone is snooping through my mail - everything on the 'Net is now spied on, by powerful government agencies like the NSA, by ISPs who provide your Internet access, by corporations like Google (terms of service for Gmail specify that they read through it and try to tailor their advertising to your tastes), by the Mafia, by hackers all over the world.

Even if that is so, why would you add one more large, rich, powerful, and unscrupulous corporation to the long line of entities already snooping on you? If you have one dog in your neighbourhood that tries to bite you every time it sees you, would it motivate you to invite other people with hostile dogs to move into your neighbourhood, too?

Back to the Linux virus issue, there have been a few proof-of-concept Linux viruses in the labs, and there have been some Linux worms that did make it out of the lab and onto the 'Net. But they are incredibly few and far between compared to Windows viruses and malware. Last time I checked, many years ago, the number of active Windows malware threats numbered in the hundreds of thousands. For Linux? I think not even in the tens. And entirely new categories of Windows malware have sprung up since then, such as cryptware/ransomware.

I am not suggesting there is such a thing as an invulnerable operating system - there isn't. But there are operating systems with a terrible record for (lack of ) security, and others with far fewer blemishes in their history. Windows has the worst security record of any operating system that has ever existed on planet earth, and by a wide margin, at that.

Incidentally, I don't know what is standard operating procedure for anti-virus software these days, but in ye good olde days, it was dumb software searching for the signatures of various forms of malware that might exist in files on your computer. There wasn't any snooping into things like email or written documents, the anti-virus software was far too dumb to have a clue what was in them anyway.

Things might very well be different now, with Google, et al having created some pretty powerful AI software that can parse through spoken and written human languages, and glean at least some "understanding" as to what is being said / communicated. (One reason why I have no Gmail account.)

Big Brother (and Big Sister) are, indeed, watching all of us these days. But I'm not going to put in plate-glass roofs and walls to make it even easier for him/her.

Leaving all these more subjective issues aside, I feel no lack in Linux - there isn't really anything I wish I had, and cannot get, on Linux. So why would I want to move to another operating system, particularly one that is much less secure, much less flexible, runs slower, and costs more?

-Gnobuddy
 
Gnobuddy 11/30/2017 8:01 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
Microsoft Outlook and Quarantine are components of Office 365 so your employer has given Microsoft permission to snoop in your email scanning for viruses and other malware. I guess you are using your employer's computer so you probably have no say in the matter.
Thank you for that, I suspected something along those lines.

And you're quite right, at work, I have limited choice, I have to use at least some parts of the software ecosystem provided by my employer. But this revelation about MS snooping through my email has me thinking I might take my own Linux PC to work, and see if I can't get most of my work done without having to use Windows.

I might not have a choice when it comes to Outlook (the 'Web version will still be linked to Microsoft Snooping Dot Com), but I might be able to plug other security leaks that are surely part of the Windows eco-system I'm forced to use at work now.

-Gnobuddy
 
big_teee 12/4/2017 12:22 PM
I use ClamAV to periodically scan my Ubuntu Linux home folder, for virus, and malware.
I don't use anything real time.
No email, or web scanning, that slows down the web browser too much!
I do use U-block real time ad blocker!
I periodically scan my home folder for Virus, and Malware.
That way I can rule out that I am passing anything on to other users.
See Screenshot, of ClamTK, scan.
T
 
imf 12/6/2017 3:49 PM
There are definitely viruses and malware for Linux, not as much as for Windows or Microsoft products, because Microsoft dominates the market, so obviously there will be more developed for that software. That's changing though. You just can't be careless as a user... that's always the main thing, and that goes for any OS.

However, there are plenty of vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel and specific distros, Debian/Ubuntu obviously have the most, as Debian derivatives are the most used, and so the most are found on it. In fact the past couple of years there's been much more vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel and Debian/Ubuntu distros than Windows OS. The good thing about Linux and Mac is they get patched rather quickly, but Windows is on the ball as well, last I checked, as they should be.

I didn't think Windows 7 or 10 was that bad at all when I had it running, I eventually ran into issue and I'm more familiar with Unix OS's than Windows, so I scrapped it after I got a Macbook to run my DAW software with my outboard AD/DA converters.

I still don't think I'd tell someone to switch from Windows 10 to Ubuntu if they have no interest in learning Linux and are already familiar with Windows, just your average computer user, no. Linux has come a long way though, on the desktop that is. They still have a bunch of stuff to work out under the hood.
 
Gnobuddy 12/6/2017 4:24 PM
Quote Originally Posted by imf View Post
because Microsoft dominates the market, so obviously there will be more developed for that software.
I've heard this from Microsoft for fifteen years now, but the facts don't bear out the claim. MS may dominate the desktop, but Linux dominates servers - the very computers most at risk from worms, viruses, and other internet threats. Here are a few excerpts from this September's Netcraft survey of nearly nine million servers (full article here: https://news.netcraft.com/archives/2...er-survey.html)

Quote Originally Posted by Netcraft
While more than half of the websites in the survey are using Microsoft web server software, relatively few of these are active sites. Discounting link farms, domain holding pages and other automatically generated content, Microsoft accounts for only 7.3% of all active sites, while Apache leads with 44.9%, and nginx follows with 20.7%. Microsoft's active sites share has never exceeded Apache's, and ever since it peaked at 38% in early 2009, it has experienced a general decline.

Microsoft's presence within the top million websites has also been steadily declining – in 2008, it had a 20% share, but this has since dwindled to less than 10%. Today, 9.73% of the top million sites use Microsoft web server software (mostly IIS – Internet Information Services), while Apache leads with 38.9%. However, Apache has also been experiencing a general decline since 2011, while nginx has continued to muscle its way in. A further 1,299 nginx-powered sites made their way into the top million this month, lifting nginx's share to 29.4%.
Web-facing operating systems

Apache has been the most commonly installed web server for many years, but which underlying operating systems are used by the world's web facing computers?

By far the most commonly used operating system is Linux, which runs on more than two-thirds of all web-facing computers. This month alone, the number of Linux computers increased by more than 91,000; and again, this strong growth can largely be attributed to cloud hosting providers, where Linux-based instances are typically the cheapest and most commonly available.
Big teee doesn't want these sorts of discussions in this thread, but I thought it was worth noting that Microsoft's claim "we're only insecure because we own the biggest market share" isn't true. In fact, MS is so insecure that fewer than a third of web servers run it these days, and those that do, often have a vested interest (MS owns them, say).

In years past, there was a period when MS used to host their own Hotmail email service on servers running FreeBSD - not Windows - a fact which caused much merriment among the Open-Source community.

-Gnobuddy
 
imf 12/6/2017 4:39 PM
Quote Originally Posted by Gnobuddy View Post
I've heard this from Microsoft for fifteen years now, but the facts don't bear out the claim. MS may dominate the desktop, but Linux dominates servers - the very computers most at risk from worms, viruses, and other internet threats. Here are a few excerpts from this September's Netcraft survey of nearly nine million servers (full article here: https://news.netcraft.com/archives/2...er-survey.html)



Big teee doesn't want these sorts of discussions in this thread, but I thought it was worth noting that Microsoft's claim "we're only insecure because we own the biggest market share" isn't true. In fact, MS is so insecure that fewer than a third of web servers run it these days, and those that do, often have a vested interest (MS owns them, say).

In years past, there was a period when MS used to host their own Hotmail email service on servers running FreeBSD - not Windows - a fact which caused much merriment among the Open-Source community.

-Gnobuddy
All OS are at risk for viruses and malware just the same. Microsoft definitely dominated the desktop by a long shot, Mac is huge now and Linux is nowhere close. I am talking about general computer users here, not servers.

As far as servers go, there are more vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel and OS's than Windows 10 or Windows server for the past 5 years at least. There has been plenty of vulnerabilities in Apache.

Microsoft Azure is huge in the cloud as well, although you can run anything you want on it.
 
big_teee 12/8/2017 7:29 AM
Ubuntu Linux is still a great OS, and it is still Free.
https://www.ubuntu.com/
All the Supporting software, like office, AV, various editors, utilities, firewalls, etc, are also free.
With the Cost Factor, all the individual file & control, AV resistance, etc?
It wins in my book, hands down!
Other security features I also enable, are UEFI, & Secure Boot.
With Ubuntu you can enable both!
Every time I get a new laptop with win 8.1, or win 10, I can't get rid of the Windows quick enough.
Linux is Fast and efficient, and makes a fine desktop!
YMMV,
T
**The wallpaper picture on my desktop, is of Morro Rock, in Morro Bay, CA.
My friend Allen (Corona Blue), who rides his bicycle there, emailed it to me, a while back.
BTW-Allen is also a Fellow Computer Linux Distro-Hopper (Preference is Mint Cinnamon, And Xubuntu) !
 
Dave H 12/8/2017 10:51 AM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
Ubuntu Linux is still a great OS, and it is still Free.
https://www.ubuntu.com/
Which version of Ubuntu is that teee? It has the taskbar at the bottom. The one I tried had the taskbar at the top like the picture in your link.
 
big_teee 12/8/2017 11:14 AM
Quote Originally Posted by Dave H View Post
Which version of Ubuntu is that teee? It has the taskbar at the bottom. The one I tried had the taskbar at the top like the picture in your link.
I run XFCE for the desktop.
It starts out with the top panel, but is real easy to move it to the bottom.
This one would be the one to start with.
https://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=xubuntu
If you decide to load it, I can help you get it to the bottom.
Panel preferences, unlock the panel, and drag it to the bottom, and relock the panel.
see screenshots.
T
**The small vertical panel on lower left is set to autohide.
It is not normally visible, until you run the cursor over it.
 
Dave H 12/9/2017 11:50 AM
Thanks, I'll give it a try.
 
big_teee 12/10/2017 8:29 AM
Quote Originally Posted by Dave H View Post
Thanks, I'll give it a try.
Please let us know how it turns out!
GL,
T
 
big_teee 4/27/2018 8:52 AM
Ubuntu has new issues twice annually.
18.04 LTS (Long term support), just came out yesterday.
I've been running the beta versions for several months.
Some great software.
Index of /
Check it out!
T
 
Steve A. 7/14/2018 11:57 AM
Linux support for the blind community?
Terry, I was talking to a blind friend who is always raving about the screen reader apps and programs on the Apple platforms so I was wondering how Linux has been working out for the unsighted. And are there some specific builds that are better than others?

Thanks!

Steve A.

P.S. There is no need to sell me on Linux... I am already using Android for 99% of my computing and browsing needs and it is based on a Linux kernel as I understand the term. Windows sucks!
 
big_teee 7/14/2018 1:38 PM
I have no Idea.
I just use a regular desktop.
Currently I run XFCE desktop, and at times Gnome Desktop.
As far as selling you on Linux?
Use what you like.
But, calling Android Linux, even if it runs on a kernel, I think would be a stretch!
Android started with a modified linux kernel, for mobile devises primarily for touchscreens.
It was modified from there, and as far as I know, doesn't use standard linux kernels.
For example all my Ubu rigs are currently on generic kernel 4.15.0-24:
root@Xubu2:~# uname -a
Linux Xubu2 4.15.0-24-generic #26-Ubuntu SMP Wed Jun 13 08:44:47 UTC 2018 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux
GL & Have Fun!
T
 
big_teee 7/14/2018 3:59 PM
I run Multi-boot Laptops, with a minimum of 2 Ubuntu Distros Loaded on them.
At boot you pick the Distro from the Grub bootloader.
I recently loaded a third distro, this one runs the Gnome desktop.
Gnome is very fast, and runs the Firefox browser quickly.
Here's a screenshot of it.
Gnome is another Linux desktop choice.
T
 
Steve A. 7/14/2018 4:43 PM
Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
I have no Idea.
I just use a regular desktop.
I was asking for a blind friend and have no idea where to even start looking. The blind have computers and laptops with regular displays just like us but they use screen reader software to be able to hear what is being displayed. As fully graphical interfaces (like Win 7) have replaced more text-based interfaces (like WinXP) it makes it more difficult for blind people to use computers.

Currently I run XFCE desktop, and at times Gnome Desktop.
As far as selling you on Linux?
Use what you like.
You have already sold me on the idea of switching over to Linux as soon as I can clear enough space in my overly-cluttered condo to set up a laptop with Linux.
But, calling Android Linux, even if it runs on a kernel, I think would be a stretch!
I didn't think I was saying that but isn't the kernel the basis of the actual operating system? I was referring to the OS and not the user interface, etc., in the various distros.

More important my point was that I am very dissatisfied with Windows as an operating system. It was originally designed for individual computers while Unix and Linux was designed with computer networks in mind from Day One, right? Whereas they have to keep patching Windows to keep up with the ever-changing modern world...

FWIW it is usually Linux programmers who provide the most help on Android user forums perhaps because they speak the same language...? I really don't know — I just follow their tips when I am looking for help.

Peace out

Steve A.
 
Steve A. 7/15/2018 5:38 AM
A question for you, Terry...
It was my understanding that the Linux kernel includes procedures for swapping RAM. What do you think impresses me the most about Android? The touch screen? The user interface?

No, what impresses me the most about Android is how it handles multitasking which is far better than Windows and how it addresses the internet which is far safer than Windows. I am pretty sure all of that comes from the basic Linux kernels. I am mainly concerned with how a computer or device handles whatever tasks I might throw at it.

Yes, Terry, I hate to admit it but I am an incorrigible computer nerd more concerned about how my damned computer works than the user interface.

And as I mentioned before all of the Android experts and developers at sites like XDA seem to be Linux nerds, which in some cases might be what they do for a living while they screw around with Android in their free time.

I really appreciate this thread you started, Terry, as it has been an important factor in my decision a few years ago to switch to Linux once I clear out enough space in front of my PC to sit down in front of it. Or even make enough space to use one of my laptops.

Hmmm... I do have some very sturdy TV trays... two of them with a piece of MDF clamped across the top would be great for using a Linux laptop at least temporarily. So maybe that will happen sooner than I thought.


Peace out!

Steve A.

EDIT I did find a good article which discussed how well some of the distros work for the blind community and will post a link and a PDF later. I guess for some a command line interface might work best. If keyboard macros are supported that would certainly simplify inputting some of those complicated Linux commands... Heck, I might try it on one of my laptops!
 
big_teee 7/15/2018 9:51 AM
No procedure for RAM swap that I'm aware of.
Just install your additional ram and turn it on, and boot.
One of the main things the kernel does is house and include all hardware drivers.
That is why it is important to use a linux with upgraded kernel, so you get all the newer drivers required for new computer hardware.

Gnome does have a lot of Universal Access, for the Seeing and Hearing impaired.
Including High contrast, large text, Cursor size, zoom, sound keys. & Screen Readers.

Speaking of under the hood?
The reason I run linux, is because you have better control of what and who, is doing what, with your private data.
T
 
nosaj 8/4/2018 4:47 PM
Big Tee in your opinion what is the best linux os for older laptops?
And do you have any experience with SDR?(Software Defined Radio)

thanks,

nosaj
 
nosaj 8/4/2018 5:34 PM
Big Tee in your opinion what is the best linux os for older laptops?
And do you have any experience with SDR?(Software Defined Radio)

thanks,

nosaj